Converting Auto Engine for Outboard

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by nimblemotors, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 244
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 4
    Location: Sacramento

    nimblemotors Senior Member

    Anyone attempt/do this? I've got 3-cyl Suzuki 1.0L engine and am considering adapting it to a 150hp V6 Suzuki Outboard. I can see a couple issues off the bat, the first is the vertical orientation. Looks like a dry-sump oiling system will be needed, and that looks expensive? At least the race parts are.
    Second is the exhaust, as the 2-stroke block routes it down the tail section.
    Third is the flywheel wanting to be at the "bottom" and not the top like the outboard motor.

    Given the cost of a new outboard, it seems worthwhile to look into this conversion.
     
  2. Rangerspeedboat
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 120
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: Texas

    Rangerspeedboat Senior Member

    Thats not a bad idea, How much HP is the auto engine?

    Salt water will eat away the engine, water pump from outboard lower unit must be used. I dont know how to convert the oiling system though.

    It may be worth it. maybe.
     
  3. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 244
    Likes: 3, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 4
    Location: Sacramento

    nimblemotors Senior Member

    The 3-cyl 1.0L motor was rated at 50hp in the car.
    It weighs only 125lbs. They can be tweaked to 100hp,
    my plan would be to add an intercooled turbo and get 125hp.

    There is also the 1.6L 4-cyl motor used in the 4x4 Geo Trackers,
    they have 75hp stock, also has aluminum heads and block.
    But I already have the 3-cyl motor.
     
  4. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 3,324
    Likes: 145, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1819
    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    You guessed right, the lube system must be altered otherwise the lower cylinder will drown. Car makers use a dry sump for sports or racing models because they need a flat engine. There are two oil pumps, one to lubricate the engine, the other to excavate the used oil.
    For your application you need separate oil tank, positioned lower than the 3rd cylinder and connect both the oil pan and the pump to it.
     
  5. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 1,405
    Likes: 33, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 404
    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    the only simple way to turn a car engine into an outboard is to use it as a Thai Longtail....works for them ....
     
  6. ben2go
    Joined: Jul 2008
    Posts: 183
    Likes: 4, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 13
    Location: Upstate, South Carolina,USA

    ben2go Boat Builder Wanna Be

    I agree.There is to many issues with an outboard set up.With a long tail you only have to deal with cooling,drive unit, and a balanced pivot point.
     
  7. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 1,405
    Likes: 33, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 404
    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    some use the radiator and fan ..some pick up water from behind he prop ..some use the gearbox and drive the shaft in second gear ..and utilise the clutch...main problem left hand prop ..piviot can be car half shaft with a big u on thetop ..lots of photos on here or talk to Frosty ( got your filter right yet ? )
     

  8. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 2,903
    Likes: 61, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 719
    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    A well known tunnel boat racer in Australia put a 350 chev on a ccc trunk 20 years ago
    Very fast in the straight line but too much weight up top for the corners.
    It was a cast iron block job.
    It actually had a stock car sump and the dry sump pipes in the bottom.
    I assume a few baffles inside as well.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.