conversion from boat to car - 1970 440 super bee

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by loreman_31, Apr 4, 2011.

  1. loreman_31
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    loreman_31 Junior Member

    I have a 1970 440 super bee motor in my boat,could i convert that to a car motor if possible. any input would be great
     
  2. loreman_31
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    loreman_31 Junior Member

    would there be alot of modifying to do this,i was told that the numbers on the motor would tell the story but havent been able to find a link that could put my mind at ease
     
  3. loreman_31
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    loreman_31 Junior Member

    what i want to do is take the boat motor out and put it in a car ,is it possible to change it to work in a car
     
  4. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    That's probably a marinized Dodge Super Bee V8 car engine, a Chrysler 440 RB 'Big Block' (7.22 L / 440 cu). If so, you could take the marinizing parts off and replace them by the original car parts. Make an inversion of the linked process...

    Inboard Hardware: Marinizing the engine - and - The "Marinizing" Process - Continued

    What happens to the boat..?

    Good luck!
    Angel
     
  5. loreman_31
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    loreman_31 Junior Member

    thats great thanks for the info
     
  6. loreman_31
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    loreman_31 Junior Member

    I need a new boat but the motor i would like to salvage,apparently if it can be converted the motor could be worth 4-6 thousand according to a a mechanic that builds hotrods,then i could buy a new boat
     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I guess that's for the standard version with a single four-barrel carburetor, if you're lucky you have a 440 ‘‘Six-Pack’’ (three two-barrel carbs) that would better the price even further . . :)

    Pre 1972 RB blocks are standard more powerful than after because of 1972 emissions regulations.

    Good luck!
    Angel
     
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    If it was a 426 it could have been a Hemi, that or a 440 Magnum* would be the Jackpot..!!

    The 440 Magnum was officially not available in the 1970 Dodge Super Bee, though. But check to be sure to get paid for it if you accidently have one...

    * named: 'TNT' in Chryslers, 'Super Commando' in Plymouths, 'Magnum' in Dodges.

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Just found that the 440 Magnum is '4bbl' I guess that stands for a four barrel carb. It could be more powerfull than the 440 ‘‘Six-Pack’’ but I'm confused here, so check my info to be sure ;)

    I looked into my vague memories and at Chrysler B & RB engines (RB halfway down) and Dodge Super Bee and Dodge Coronet, dig deeper if you want to know more :idea:

    I'm from a area where they used to build tractors with a lot of these engines on one tractor and tuned them too, but nowadays something bigger got into use . . :D

    [​IMG]
    Very old version of Baby Duck with 2 x V8.

    Cheers,
    Angel
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It will fit right in. The marine parts are higher quality and/or safer than the original automotive type. It is set up for high torque which you want for a heavy car anyway.
     
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    What about the water-cooled exhaust manifolds..? If there is no water... the air flowing along will not cool them properly because of the jacket..

    The water jacketed exhaust manifolds can be sold separately and might be more worth (if a buyer is found) than the original car manifolds that have to be bought.

    But the whole thing sold as a marine engine complete with transmision, and maybe shaft and prop, is probably most profitable (the price of an incomplete car engine might be doubled) ... but to find a marine buyer can be more difficult then for the car engine... best is if you can show it with the boat in the water running..

    Good luck!
    Angel
     
  12. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Loreman,

    Don't know where you are in Canada, but this boat, from a forum member, is for sale in Iroquois, Ontario. Maybe he can advice how to sell the 'Chrysler 440 RB Big Block'* as an complete marine engine so you can buy his boat ? . . . . * if it is that

    Good luck!
    Angel
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are several differences on the B-block marine conversions that would not make it a good straight in automotive swap. The cam, alternator, exhaust manifolds and starter being the big items. Depending on the year the intake manifold too.

    You could have a 426 wedge, not a hemi, which also would be a valuable engine, though not as much as a hemi.

    Your buddy is correct, the block serial and casting numbers will reveal all about the engine. Check the numbers and see what type of "raised deck" B you have. Maybe you'll get lucky and find an old "Max Wedge" set of heads on this puppy, which will be worth more then the block.
     

  14. Jim_Hbar
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    Jim_Hbar Junior Member

    IF the engine is truly a "1970 440 super bee motor", the person that might buy it for a "premium" price is likely only interested in the fact that it has the correct code stamp(s) and casting numbers to match up to his car, and the main components such as the block and heads are in good enough condition to be rebuilt/blueprinted..
    Having been used in a boat, the block and heads could very well be rotting from the inside out.

    You will need to do plenty of research, and have lots of patience and luck to find the documentation and the right buyer.
    Heck, you might even find out that the engine won the 1970 Daytona 500.:D (But IIRC, that engine was a 426 Hemi)

    If the numbers don't match up, it is a used 40 year old boat engine with undocumented provenance, and unknown core integrity.
    Brand new 440 crate long-blocks go for under $3000 Click here , so that's what you are competing with.
    You should see if your mechanic will give you 1/2 of what he says it's worth.

    If it has the marine carb, alternator, starter etc. which it should have, those components will not make one iota of difference to the person that is interested in the engine for it's code stamps. But personally, I would not consider an engine that had been used in a boat for a high dollar restoration project, unless the block and heads had been checked and tested by a very reputable firm. The only time that code stamps and casting numbers make a difference is right at the pinnacle of automotive restoration/preservation, and for those $$$,000.00, only the very best will do.

    If you are looking for an engine to "throw" in a car, most of the components on it will work, with the major exceptions being the exhaust manifolds and the spark arrestor.. There may be some other trinkets that need to be swapped out also.. Don't expect it to be easy on fuel.

    But if you are asking this type of question on an internet boat forum, you are in way over your head already....

    My 2 cents, HTH's.

    Jim
     
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