Container Transportable Boat

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by SLM, May 12, 2014.

  1. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    You could quite safely not carry the mast, and for cruising comfort, its a good idea, as it gets on the way

    Its a law of physics - you cant have the space as well as the features. Quite a few owners have put in built in larger tanks. Diesel engines are heavy, making towing more problematic, and having them inside takes up a lot of room. Also, for the hull shape, getting a prop tube at an optimum angle just isnt practical


    Re cost - it would pay to locate a good used one, which will often have useful extra gear installed, and all the 'bugs' ironed out. If you are lucky, you might find a good bargain from a keen seller. The hulls are 100% fibreglass, so the problems of woodrot etc are absent. I think that some scratches and dents in a used hull are a good thing, especially if they save you thousands.

    Mac 26's were built by Roger macgregor http://www.macgregor26.com/ , who retired and got Tattoo to build them instead.



    This is a very important point. I would be interested to see if there is a way of getting a naval Architect to recommend any changes and certify a Mac/Tattoo for European import. The requirements for a boat of this size are probably not going to be that great, and may only require some relatively easy mods


    eg


    http://www.nordhavn.com/resources/tech/boat_building_standards.php

    or


    "CE Certification
    CE Certification for used boats via PCA (Post Construction Assessment).
    What is the cost?
    Typically the cost is approximately 2200 Euros plus travel expenses (excludes VAT) for a 2004 or newer boat to Category C &D boat (See below for Category descriptions). This includes the CE certificate, inspection, documentation, amended owner’s manual, builder’s plate, and supplementary hull number plates. Additional costs may be applicable for Category B and Category A boats in order to calculate the vessel’s inherent stability. The costs for the additional documentation may include an incline test, hull measurement, stability calculations, and determination of righting moments. We will quote a price to you if you require this type of stability assessment."

    http://www.weshipboats.com/CE_Certification
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2014
  2. SLM
    Joined: May 2014
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    Location: Sydney, Australia

    SLM Junior Member

    I have spoken to the local Tattoo 26 agent and he is shipping the boats into Australia in containers. They do fit inside a High Cube Container. From what I understand (and he has promised to get me some pictures) is that the trailer wheels and guards are removed and the boat slides inside on the trailer. However I get the impression it maybe a little more involved than this. He implied that there are some 'extra bits' required to load it into the container (which he can supplied with the boat rather than dumping them). This is not a bad option but cruising for extended periods with the mast folded (say on canals) maybe an issue. I suppose a lot depends on how easy it is to raise and lower the mast. The big advantage of this boat is that it has a retractable center board and with this retracted has low draft making it suitable for some of the smaller canals. This boat has some pros and cons ... I would still prefer a cruiser but I am yet to find one suitable. I am going to organize to have a look at a Tattoo 26. Pricing is not too bad as these things go.

    Still keep the ideas for a suitable cruiser rolling in !! I would be happy to trade the rear double bunk in the Tattoo for a small internal diesel engine in a cruiser rather than relying on an outboard.
     
  3. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    About the simplest method of raising a small sail mast is to udse a OTS flag pole raising unit.

    These are usually have a curved rack and pinion that does the work.

    Mount it as you would a tabernackle and crank away.
     
  4. rustybarge
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 533
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    Location: Ireland

    rustybarge Cheetah 25' Powercat.



    Do you have a link, or a diagram?
     
  5. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I have only scan read this thread. You don't need to comply with the RCD if the boat is homebuilt and not sold within 5 years.

    I would have said the cheapest, simplest thing to do if you want to cruise European waterways is to buy a boat that is already there. Probably cheaper than shipping one there and back

    Same thing as travelling by land. You wouldn't ship your RV/campervan across the world. You'd buy one in the destination and then resell it when you leave

    My 26ft Elf catamaran can be shipped in a container, even though it has a bridgedeck cabin. So too could my Skoota 20 and 24 powercats

    This page shows how to raise/lower a mast

    http://sailingcatamarans.com/index.php/articles/11-technical-articles/268-safe-mast-lowering-method

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  6. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    I hear one big gripe of renting yachts is you spend your vacation fixing stuff the rental folks lied to you about.

    So bringing your own starts looking better.
     
  7. rustybarge
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 533
    Likes: 3, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 37
    Location: Ireland

    rustybarge Cheetah 25' Powercat.

    +1

    Renting isn't the same as owning your own little retreat, with all your personal clutter and mess.:D
     
  8. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
    Posts: 1,799
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    Location: SF bay

    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    "Renting isn't the same as owning your own little retreat, with all your personal clutter and mess."

    plus you don't gotta sweat passing 'inspection' and cleaning lots of crap that was dirty when you got it.

    I'm guessing you need to do a video documented 'survey' before renting to have any chance of not being billed for a whole slew of pre-existing problems.
     

  9. Westfield 11
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Location: Los Angeles

    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    This may be the case with rentals like the Moorings (I don't know having never used them), but our experience with charters was different. We bareboated a De Fever 65 and an Ocean Alexander 50 Mk1 and everything was perfect, the boats were as well equipped and maintained as I would have done myself. It's not cheap, but it cost a lot less than ownership and the best part was just walking away at the end of the two weeks not having to worry about the boats ever again. I suppose it depends upon where you get your temporary boat.....
     
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