Console core

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by fallguy, Mar 25, 2020.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 2,652
    Likes: 233, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    Is this too heavy for a console core in a foam build?

    It is 3/4" ply with 12 oz glass on the face and 17 oz on the back. It weighs 20 pounds or so.

    An equivalent 12mm core with say 24 oz glass each side is 6.5 pounds, but not sure it will ever be as stiff and things like helms bolting to it probably require insets.

    Before you throw darts. I probably would have used 12mm corelite, but I think my vendors are shut down, and I realized I am behind on getting the materials. 12mm 26# corelite would be 13 pounds with same glass as light foam.

    I do have 12mm 12# core available....hmmm, maybe that would be better, but I lose two days..
    5FE4BEC8-6339-4209-A438-C303EFBEA697.jpeg
     
  2. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
    Posts: 341
    Likes: 110, Points: 43
    Location: Vancouver bc

    DogCavalry Senior Member

    How heavy is the boat overall? The extra 6 pounds is nothing. I eat lunches that heavy. Or are you concerned about the structural hard point?

    Certainly speaking as a carpenter who regularly installs heavy things, I'm always overjoyed to find massive backing, right where I want to put heavy screws. So your plywood sounds ideal.
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 2,652
    Likes: 233, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    thanks, I taped it in today; decided to eat the 10 pounds

    not too worried about the hard points...I have a few of them here and there, but not in the hulls; just on the cabin

    displacement is 8600 pounds

    I am going over with engines about 120 pounds each, and 25 pounds jackplates, so already 145 heavy on the arse.

    Then I used mat backed tapes for simplicity in the build. That is the biggest weight adder. I am a bit nervous about them now toward the end. My hulls are 32 footers and came in at about 1600 each or so. I couldn't really lift them after 1400 because I was afraid of a single point lift. The gantry is homemade and was designed for two point lifting so the crane lift didn't really suit the lifting method well. I am hoping the cabin comes in at 3000, which would mean I am at 6400 before engines and fuel. But that might be a fantasy. The engines and fuel will add 1600 pounds. So, theoretically, if I am at 32oo for the hulls, plus 1600 for engines and fuel, plus 3000 for the cabin, and about 400 for the beams I'd come in at 8200. Just feels like I am dreaming on the 3000 pound cabin though. Good news is it isn't very big. Bad news is is there is some plywood.

    And a few places I used plywood here and there where I thought it best. I think all of the places I went heavy are sort of playing on my brain right now.

    ppi is 700, so if I am 700 pounds heavy, I ride an inch low
     
    DogCavalry likes this.

  4. DogCavalry
    Joined: Sep 2019
    Posts: 341
    Likes: 110, Points: 43
    Location: Vancouver bc

    DogCavalry Senior Member

    I over did it on my bulkheads. I feel your pain.
     
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