Confederacy Half hull

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Charles Johnson, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Charles Johnson
    Joined: Mar 2004
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Las Vegas, Nevada USA

    Charles Johnson New Member

    Hello All,
    I recently discovered that a relative of mine served as a marine on the 32 gun frigate "Confederacy" (1781). The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich sold me a copy of the 5 existing drawings of this ship. They show, in quantitative detail, the form of the hull and the deck plans. Structural details and rigging are not shown.

    The plan is to make a half hull for display. I visualize scaning the hull shape into my PC and then digitilize the form. From there it should be possible check the form, rescale, and plot out all of the necessary templates for a half hull construction. So much for concept. Now for the part wherein lives the devil.

    Can someone recomend software reasonable in price, tactable to operate and which will not turn into a second career?

    Thank You,
    Charles Johnson
     
  2. captword
    Joined: Jan 2004
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    Location: Morehead City North Carolina

    captword Junior Member

    matbe someone else will come up with the answer that you want but propably the best way is to hire one of the members here to do it for you.
    I am learning the art of tryng to get what my family has built by looks onto a computer
    Howard
     
  3. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Port Gamble, Washington, USA

    tspeer Senior Member

    It's not all that difficult to make the model yourself. Sugar pine is a nice, easily worked choice of material. Print out waterlines spaced according to the thickness of the wood (say, 3/4"). Cut out some station templates to use in checking the shape. Paper printouts glued to masonite is not a bad way to go for these.

    Bandsaw the wood to the shape of the waterlines at the top of each piece, leaving a little margin for sanding, etc. Then carve away the outside corners of the "wedding cake" down to the inside corners. You can do a lot of shaping with 60 grit sandpaper wrapped around an appropriately sized block, or a round dowel to work the concave contours.

    I'll bet you can do it in a couple of industrious weekends, and learn a lot in the process.

    A school in Seattle builds models this way as an annual project. Check it out at
    http://www.r-boat.org -> Pond Model -> Follow the progress of building the boats.
    The kids eat it up - sharp instruments and molten metal; Cool!
     
  4. Charles Johnson
    Joined: Mar 2004
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    Location: Las Vegas, Nevada USA

    Charles Johnson New Member

    Thanks

    We will see if there are any offers. Thanks for the suggestion.
    C. Johnson
     

  5. Charles Johnson
    Joined: Mar 2004
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Las Vegas, Nevada USA

    Charles Johnson New Member

    Inspiring.

    The r-boat.org sit is inspiring. They are using the bread and butter system I plan to use. Thanks for the lead.
    C. Johnson
     
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