Conceptual Boat Project

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Mattisthinking, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. Mattisthinking
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    Mattisthinking Junior Member

    I am a college student going to school for Industrial design. This semester one of the projects I am working on is a powerboat. Thought I would share my progress, although it is conceptual I still wanted to keep some of the main elements real. Look forward to your opinions!

    ,Matt

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  2. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Matt; you draw sexy looking boats. That is good. You have some serious design flaws and that is not good. For starters you will need to get the props in the water in order for the boat to go.
     
  3. Mattisthinking
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    Mattisthinking Junior Member

    I understand that surface drive boats have props in that location?
     
  4. Perm Stress
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    Perm Stress Senior Member

    About half the prop diameter still has to be below the transom edge. :p
     
  5. Mattisthinking
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    Mattisthinking Junior Member

    Any input would be great, as I am in only the first few weeks of this project and there is a lot of time for change. I just want to make sure this is somewhat believable as yet still a styling exercise where I can push the limits of what boats are without to much cross over.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Nice design. The propellers have to be submerges about 50-60% below the bottom. If you continue the line from the bottom, it should intersect the shaft or a bit above it. Where are the fuel tanks? The powerplant appears to be a pair of turbines.
     
  7. Mattisthinking
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    Mattisthinking Junior Member

    I have 2 fuel tanks just in-front of the turbines, Not entirely sure about the position of them or if they should be lower into the body. So you are saying that the prop needs to be at about the water line or below it? I planned to have the waterline at about 3.5' which is where I put the prop. Though I dont have a solid background in boating so I need some clarification.
    Thanks!
     
  8. Perm Stress
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    Perm Stress Senior Member

    This kind of boat will plane. In planing, there will be almost no water above transom lower edge, except spray.
    Turbines drink LOTS of fuel. Accordingly, tanks have to be fairly large. And in boats they are usually located low down, in the bottom.
    And even larger lots of air. To supply it, there has to be very substantial air intakes (so large you could crawl into), additionally, if operation in any kind of weather is intended, air intakes need reliable all-weather protection from spray, created by sea waves and mostly, by the boat itself. Spray-filled air is not healthy for turbines.
     
  9. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    This shows how much of the hull is in the water at plane.

    Granted, we're looking at an unlimited hydroplane here, but the concept still holds. A vessel on the plane moves mostly across the top of the water rather than through it, and so the props need to be at the very bottom of the hull or they will be totally out of the water at speed.

    [​IMG]

    This is closer to what you're looking at, but, as you can see, the concept remains the same. Your boat may have 3.5' of draft sitting still, but will have almost no draft under way.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Have you calculated the displacement of this boat? It looks like it may be exceedingly heavy.
     
  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    On as a practical note....entry and exit , aft and amidships while at the dock, are critical design details for a good boat. These details are the ones in which many modern highly stylized boats fall short.

    Perhaps a stantioned walkway down the centerline of the foredeck for moving fore and aft . Like a submarine

    . Fully enclosed wheelhouses are hard to live with and very hot inside...

    Forward seating looks good ,but with 50 knots of apparent wind across the foredeck it may be tedious to take in a bit of sun and read the newspaper up there. You need a two person, quite, shielded people space aft, out of the wind and in semi shade.

    People that buy those kind of boats like to be all terrain, mobile.......perhaps substitute a pair of jet skis, instead of people, in that forward sunken cockpit. perhaps a pair of Quick launch SeaBobs in torpedo tubes aft.

    To stand out, Include elegant design details that make the boat user friendly at the dock and friendly to use when going for a swim.

    Not much sleeping happens on those boats.... a single " shag'n" bunk and a pair of big bathrooms, shower will be usefull.
     
  12. Lurvio
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    Lurvio Mad scientist

    Try to find an episode of 'Build it Bigger' (aka Extreme Engineering) season six, episode 11. This is about offshore race boat Miss Geico's engines being overhauled.

    Nice looking drawings btw.

    Lurvio
     
  13. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    The steps at the hull bottom shouldn't be faired or inclined backwards. They have to be sharp, vertical (or even slightly forward-facing) and ventilated.
    Also, it looks like there's not enough buoyancy aft to support the engine room weight.

    I think it's a sexy design.
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Correct me if Im wrong, but I assume a design concept is an idea drawn by a free thinking, talented artist, like the original poster, then given to the engineers , naval architects and marketing men to create a real boat.

    Many of the modern yachts I see began as impractical artist concepts, full of design detail , that were then re engineered and carried over into the finished product..

    The boats presented look good and should draw the attention of NA's, boatbuilders and end users.
     

  15. Mattisthinking
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    Mattisthinking Junior Member

    Yeah that's basically it. I am using this project to learn as much as a can about boats but it is purely a conceptual project and all about getting radical designs down on paper.

     
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