Composite Panels

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Willallison, Nov 28, 2007.

  1. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
    Posts: 3,590
    Likes: 130, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2369
    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    As far as I'm aware, ATL are the only major suppliers of 'faced' composite panels in Australia (Duflex foam and balsa)

    Is anyone aware of any others?
     
  2. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,381
    Likes: 150, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Will, Coreman composites used to have a big laminating table, think it all got "too" hard, theres a firm in towoomba that does big panels for trucks etc & took part in a Kellsal project & I got 2 tables 1.8 x 3.6 & one thats 7.2 x 1.8, we can "sister" them up for 7.2 x 3.6 etc or you can get glass-melamine/whatever & make your own- they do glass in 3.1 x 5.? sizes but exxy to transport & support, I think you in Tas. mabe talk to Angelo P at some place south of Hobart- he could maybe set you up with some panel manufacture. All the best from Jeff.
     
  3. captainjsw
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Perth Western Australia

    captainjsw Junior Member

    Hey Will,
    Boat Craft Pacific based in Queensland do a product called Neadaplast (spelling) http://www.boatcraft.com.au/composites.html
    There site is down at the moment. But I have used it throughout my last boat. Its a honeycomb plastic core covered with either ply or fibreglass. Or a mixture of the 2 ply and ply - glass and ply - ply and nothing etc - comes in various thickness from 8mm up to 32mm - I have some 32mm for table tops - real light - a bit like ATLs featherlight but with a plastic core instead of a paper one

    Cheers John
    http://www.johnwatson.net.au
     
  4. captainjsw
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Perth Western Australia

    captainjsw Junior Member

    More on DuFlex

    Also will I am using DuFlex to build a new 17.5m catamaran we have been into it for 3 weeks or so - the wait for panels is now out to around 12 weeks - everyone seems to be into it big time.

    Cheers John
    http://www.johnwatson.net.au
     
  5. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
    Posts: 3,590
    Likes: 130, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2369
    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    Hi John
    Thanks - yes I found the Boat Craft stuff - they call them Coretech panels. As you say this covers a range of panels that includes Nidaplast honeycomb.

    I've asked them for more information, so look fwd to getting that.

    How does it compare in terms of cost to comparable Duflex panels?
    It's structural properties are quite different to both foam and balsa, having similar compressive but lower shear strength.

    Interesting web site by the way....
    Have you got pics of the new boat?


    Jeff - thanks - I'm trying to avoid having to "make" the panels if possible, though it does have the advantage of being able to make them almost any size....
     
  6. captainjsw
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Perth Western Australia

    captainjsw Junior Member

    Hey Will,

    Cost - its a few years back now and seem to think I was paying around $250 for a 20mm thick panel covered with gaboon ply either side (Coretech) - I used these for the bridgedeck - The interior was mainly costructed of 13mm Nidaplast for the none structural stuff - can't remember the cost about $180 a sheet then - but was a while ago.

    New boat yes I have a few photos. We have the side of one hull completely planked and part of the other side. I expect to fully planked with just the chamfer panel left to do after 10th Dec.

    Think I have uploaded 2 pics - not that good will get some better ones if you are interested

    Cheers John
     

    Attached Files:

  7. captainjsw
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Perth Western Australia

    captainjsw Junior Member

    well looks like only one picture
     
  8. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
    Posts: 3,590
    Likes: 130, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2369
    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    Always interested!
     
  9. captainjsw
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: Perth Western Australia

    captainjsw Junior Member

    PM me your e-mail and I'll send you some pics

    John
     
  10. raw
    Joined: Jul 2006
    Posts: 133
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 59
    Location: Oz

    raw Senior Member

    Hunt around your local builders and find somebody who can bag up panels to your own specs on a large table.

    ATL's product is good, but they are limited to 8x4's and are expensive.

    Nidacore imo is a material best left to non structural applications eg furniture, non structural shelves/locker bulkheads etc. Has a very low shear strengh compared to foams of same weight. Under no circumstances would I use this still in a structural application.
     
  11. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,381
    Likes: 150, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Capt'jsws lead time indicated of 12 weeks is a fair while, in that time a table could be easily set up- table laminating is as nice as it gets & you can incorperate tabbing rebates to the panels edges to ease fairing & after joining you gotta handle big sheets anyway. Some of the Duflex kits look like they go together pretty quick but I spose if you gotta wait for the material that might even that out a bit although the computer cut thing sounds pretty cool & the ATL panels look to be of consistant quality from what I've seen. All the best from Jeff.
     
  12. Mat-C
    Joined: May 2007
    Posts: 255
    Likes: 12, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 141
    Location: Australia

    Mat-C Senior Member

    I'd agree that the Nidaplast cores in the Coretech panels are inappropriate for most structural applications - though I note that that isn't how they're marketed ...;)
    And I have managed to locate a company that is laminating panels for their own use - hopefully they'll be prepared to supply as well.

    I think that the biggest selling point for the Duflex panels is that they are a known quantity - well known, reliable and extensively throughout the industry. Cost and size limitations are indeed their most obvious drawbacks...
     
  13. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
    Posts: 4,519
    Likes: 110, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    " Nidacore imo is a material best left to non structural applications eg furniture, non structural shelves/locker bulkheads etc. Has a very low shear strengh compared to foams of same weight. Under no circumstances would I use this still in a structural application."

    We have used the 2 inch as cabin tops on 40ft replacement job. 12ft x 14ft .

    Seemed fine with a dozen guests stomping on it , but under water would be a different story.

    FF
     

  14. petereng
    Joined: Jan 2008
    Posts: 581
    Likes: 22, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 252
    Location: Gold Coast Australia

    petereng Senior Member

    Nidacore is fine for structural applications if you take into account the lower shear strength. This usually means the panel has to be a bit thicker then if it where built from PVC. This makes the panel stiffer and stronger and you can usually use lighter skins (unless you are ruled by a std with minimum skin thickness) But its cheaper and about the same density as 80kg PVC. Many boats have been built from it 100% overseas, very big boats as well.

    I think the main problem is that some people don't vacuum bag the skins which means the skins don't bed into the Nidacore scrim very well. If its vacuumed bagged correctly they are very tough and stiff.
    Peter
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.