Composite LPG Cylinders

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by ragasco, Nov 22, 2013.

  1. ragasco
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: India

    ragasco New Member

    Hi

    My company manufactures composite LPG cylinders which are lightweight and 100% safe with more than 8 Million of them sold out in the market. I was wondering if anyone has any experience of using these cylinders with LPG engines for operating boats ? If so I would love to hear about it and maybe get some pictures also.

    Thanks

    Ravindra
     
  2. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Not Yet , most docks are not set up for a truck to come by and snake a 200 ft hose down the dock to refill a cylinder.

    Till there is a demand the marinas wont bother to spend mega bucks with their own private system , for one or two customers.

    The BuroRAT hurdles may be extreme?

    Most cruisers that have LPG aboard have it for the range , and some for the reefer.

    It is far easier to lug a swop it tank 20# to the local 7-11 or gas station , than rent a taxi and get those really expensive cylinders filled while watching.

    There a great idea for the cruiser that doesnt cruise far , and can easily get them filled at their homeport.
     
  3. ragasco
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: India

    ragasco New Member

    Thx

    Thanks for your candid response. Maybe I didnt understand certain aspects so I share further information and seek your comments.

    I was not looking at on site filling of the LPG using long pipes etc as you mention. That I agree would be impractical at this point.
    The maximum size of our cylinders is 14 kg of LPG in a 33 ltrs water capacity tank which weighs 7.5 kg when empty. Am I right in guessing that this would be insufficient to feed your boat as a fuel ?
    If you are today using a swap and go system for this application, why not a composite cylinder swap and go system ? If so I can check with my associate in Australia to explore such solutions based on level of interest.
    If today you are lugging a 20 kg LPG cylinder which would probably weigh 20+ kgs when empty dont you feel that a cylinder weight 7.5 kgs would be attractive even if it means that you spend some time getting it filled (assuming we are not talking swap and go here) ?
    Given the zero rust, 100% safety, lightweight features do you think a 2 x 14 kg solution would be attractive as against the 20 kg option ?

    I would welcome and appreciate your feedback, encouragement and advice to help us help you in offering this solution if it adds convenience to your lifestyle.

    Thanks again and regards

    Ravindra
     
  4. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    If the vessels are pleasure, you may find a market.
    If commercial, then they will have to comply with the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG)...which ostensibly says to be made from steel.
     
  5. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    There are several issues:

    1. In Europe each country has extensive legislation for pressurized containers, even more so if the contents are combustible. Getting approval is a tedious process that must be repeated for each country and applies only to one particular capacity.

    2. The legislation includes permanent signs, numbers, test data etc that are usually impacted, carved or embossed on a specific area without weakening the cylinder. The composite material may require a different technique that also needs approval.

    3. Good thermal conductivity is a requirement to maintain enough pressure in the cylinder if the evaporation takes place in the cylinder. Composite material may not qualify.

    Currently, steel cylinders for 10 kg butane/propane weigh 8-11 kg, aluminum cylinders for 8 kg gas (Italy) weigh less than 5 kg. There has been an attempt to introduce a "Euro bottle" based on the Italian standards, but national laws caused the project to fail completely.
     
  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    do you think a 2 x 14 kg solution would be attractive as against the 20 kg option ?


    Totally impractical as 50 years of existing methods for handling the refill and exchange would need to be replaced world wide, for the 1 in 1000 user that cares about weight during transport.

    Most folks just toss it in the car and drive home .
     
  7. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Location: Duluth, Minnesota

    Steve W Senior Member

    Im not sure if you are talking about running an lpg engine on the mothership or the dinghy, for the dinghy with a Lehr outboard i think the composite cylinders would be perfect, for the mothership it would be impractical as well as unsafe(the fuel,not the cylinder) I actually use your cylinders and love them, i use lpg for cooking, hot water and refrigeration. I chose the composite tanks because i couldnt fit standard steel tanks in my locker,so,since i have to get my own tanks filled the light weight is nice. I did a 1500 mile delivery this summer and had to refil 3 times,twice the dockmaster took us to refil and once the marina had a loaner car.

    Steve.
     

  8. Westfield 11
    Joined: Apr 2008
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    Location: Los Angeles

    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    I have a couple of composite LP cylinders that I use for camping and boating. I can see through the clear sides how much fuel is inside. They are all plastic and don't corrode and are very light. If I bang them against the boat they bounce and don't chip the gel coat. I fill them at the gas station or have the marina do it. I have a 3gal and 5gal.
     
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