Composite Fuel Tank

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Cacciatore, Dec 14, 2019.

  1. Cacciatore
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Cacciatore Junior Member

    Hi Guys , I need some informations to design a Composite Fuel Tank (Gasoline Unleaded - No Diesel Oil )
    Are there some requirements concerning the gelcoat and resin properties?
    I want to use only Epoxy and Fibercarbon and would like to know the rules to be compliant with CE and US Market ( some USCG restriction if any ).


    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    33 CFR, Chapter 1, Subchapter S, Part 183, Subpart J.
     
  3. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    In Europe it's this:
    ISO 21487:2012
    Small craft — Permanently installed petrol and diesel fuel tanks
     
  4. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    For the US market EPA (Enviormental Protection Agency) regulations for marine fuel tanks apply. Those regulations include permability (vapor moving through the walls) which may require testing of non-metallic materials. EPA regulations are in addition to USCG regulations.

    Also for the US market see About New Boatbuilders Home Page https://newboatbuilders.com/
     
  5. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    OP is from Italy ;)
     
  6. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    OP asked about US market compliance. Perhaps exporting to the US?:)
     
  7. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    You right, my bad!
    For the OP. However since alcohol has been added to gasoline epoxy won't work anymore as far as I know..
     
  8. Cacciatore
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    Cacciatore Junior Member

    Thank you so much for reply. What do you think about inflatable bladder inside the tank? Could be a solution?
     
  9. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Years ago all the underground metal fuel tanks at gas stations were dug up and replaced with composite tanks. My understanding is that they are laminated with vinylester resin, not epoxy. There are of course many formulations of VE ,PE and epoxy resins so it would be nice to know of a particular resin/catalyst system which is used for these tanks.
     
  10. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    FRP gasoline fuel tanks have not had a good reputation since the introduction of ethyl alcohol to gasoline in the 70's. There have been many cases of FRP tanks leaking. So if you are building FRP tanks, composite materials or otherwise you need you need to make absolutely sure the resin used is alcohol and gasoline resistant. I wish I could say, so and so is, but frankly I don't know. I ma sure some of the others here may have some good suggestions.

    Thanks Dave for the reference.

    see Boat Building Regulations | Boat Fuel System https://newboatbuilders.com/pages/fuel.html and https://newboatbuilders.com/docs/Ethanol.pdf
     
  11. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

  12. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Solution to ???? Is the bladder certified for marine use? If so to what standard?
     
  13. Cacciatore
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    Cacciatore Junior Member

    Hi DCockey thank you for reply . I have seen this fuel bladders Fuel Bladders | Custom Lightweight Boat Fuel Tanks | Aero Tec Laboratories https://www.atlltd.com/industries/marine/below-deck-fuel-water-bladders/fuel-bladders compliant with US Coast Guard (USCG 33 CFR 183.510), American Boat and Yacht Counsel (ABYC H-24) and ISO (10088) standards. I can easy welds an S.S. or an Aluminium Tank but I can't remove the tank if necessary because is undercut the bulwark.So the solution is to destroy the boat within the next 20 years.The only trouble with bladders will be some internal baffles internal the tank to avoid the sloshing of fuel.
     
  14. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Ask the manufacturer about compliance with relevant US EPA permability standards. Added: The US EPA permability standards may only apply to gasoline, not to diesel. Check the standards. Testing is probably required. My understanding is the permability standards are difficult but not impossible to meet materials other than metal. The US EPA requirements are in addition to USCG requirements, and meeting USCG requirements does not mean the tank meets US EPA requirements.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Phenolic/Novolac Epoxy linings are used in fuel tanks
     
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