Composite Deck Hardware Options/ Methods

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Charly, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 2,467
    Likes: 123, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 693
    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    good going... all you have to do is figure a neat way of attaching them and your done... this could have been done all in 1 shot so its already attached to the hatch i reckon :D
     
  2. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 429
    Likes: 32, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 377
    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    I had to cut it short today because of the rain, so here are some more shots of the progress...

    Guess I'll have to wait till tomorrow to see if the hatch opens or not:) The plastic underneath is to keep the hinge from bonding to the hull where it shouldn't. I filled that part with bog first, so it should imprint a recess for the hinge there. If it works I'll pull the peelply and add a layer of biax over the hinge "wings" at the deck and on the hatch, and cover the ends of the pins with more bog, fair it all out etc.

    The mating of the hinge pieces isn't difficult really. But it is better to start too tight, and gradually sand or cut where needed till it stops binding and opens freely without distorting the pin. Pin alignment is critical on the hinge itself and with the other hinge pin as well. The pins axis needs to be as close as possible to a right angle to the hatch. Have I forgotten anything?:D

    The tie downs came out pretty well, I thought. A three foot length of pipe makes a sh*tload of them.
     

    Attached Files:

    • 003.JPG
      003.JPG
      File size:
      653.7 KB
      Views:
      653
    • 011.JPG
      011.JPG
      File size:
      599.7 KB
      Views:
      1,482
    • 006.JPG
      006.JPG
      File size:
      670.3 KB
      Views:
      836
    • 008.JPG
      008.JPG
      File size:
      704 KB
      Views:
      2,013
    • 009.JPG
      009.JPG
      File size:
      674.6 KB
      Views:
      842
    • 012.JPG
      012.JPG
      File size:
      656 KB
      Views:
      734
  3. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 2,467
    Likes: 123, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 693
    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    not exactly the way i had envisioned, but im sure itll come out fine, and bullet proof! Youll sink the boat trying to break those! WOW...

    Could you have simply recessed the hinges further in both directions, trimmed the plastic rod flush with the hinge body so it fits into the recesses, and not have to back fill with bog to close up the gap between the hatch cover and deck edge?
     
  4. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 429
    Likes: 32, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 377
    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    I think the photo perspective might make them look bigger than they really are...kinda like the old fisherman's trick of holding the fish at arms length towards the camera:D. They are stout though...

    The idea with letting the pins runwild of the hinge was to bog over them there at the ends too, anchoring the pin that much more, I'll have to put some wax on the side of the hinge when I do that so it won't stick to any moving parts. It is hard to tell from the photos but the final layer of cloth should cover everything up flush. The barrels of the hinges will not be covered of course, but they will be flush and blend in with the deck. No toe stumpers. It is not very beautiful yet though, i will post some more pics when I get it all faired out.

    Now all I have to do is figure out how to make some dogs. I am thinking just some simple handles- like a handle on a shut off valve, pivoting on a nylon bolt that is embedded into the overhead, and some wedges of wood or bog attached to the hatch for the end of the handle to snug up against when closed. OOPs got that backwards, handles on the hatch wedges on the overhead.

    Then a dodger and a way to prop it open that doesn't look to crude.. and done.:D

    Ideas welcomed. This hatch is directly over the head btw

    groper, the bog under the hinge between the barrel and the edge of the hatch was just to fair it out. I couldn't cut a neat enough mortise, so I just gouged and ground and then refilled
     
  5. charlyIII
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: st simons island ga

    charlyIII Junior Member

    I am still interested in making my own cleats. I need eight total for the boat.

    Just looking around I can get the nylon conventional hollow base cleats cheap cheap. I doubt they would be adequate, I but dont know for sure. I guess the way they are fastened and backed, through the deck, is just as, if not more important than the material. I figure that the base of the cleats compressive strength is all that really matters IF the thru bolts and backer plates are beefy enough? Something tells me those attwood nylon cheapies won't do in a clinch. Opinions?

    Meanwhile, I have been taking advantage of some slack time to make up a plywood prototype. I reckon a two inch dia vertical base with a 3 inch disk mounted on top (to function as the "horn" would on a traditional cleat). I am thinking, thru fasten with a piece of fiberglass rod in each disc (there would be two discs per cleat, so they would tie off in a figure eight, just like traditional) and then glass the whole thing up , six ways to sunday. Anyone else tried this? These are for docklines.

    The grainger site sells fiberglass rod in various diameters. The tensile strength is listed as 100,000 psi. IF I understand correctly this is higher than stainless?? Is tensile strength the important thing to consider in this kind off app?

    Thanks for all input

    I could also lace the thing to the deck with some uni fabric, maybe to resist uplift. I guess if the rod was set in at an angle, this would resist uplift also.
     
  6. Charly
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 429
    Likes: 32, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 377
    Location: st simons island ga

    Charly Senior Member

    here it is in the rough
     

    Attached Files:

    • 001.JPG
      001.JPG
      File size:
      625.8 KB
      Views:
      367
    • 002.JPG
      002.JPG
      File size:
      602.3 KB
      Views:
      293
  7. charlyIII
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 15
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 24
    Location: st simons island ga

    charlyIII Junior Member

  8. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 2,467
    Likes: 123, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 693
    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    You can buy solid fibreglass or G10 epoxy rod from various places on the web... simply cut it up and wrap over it with glass tape and feather it down onto the hull wall or bulkhead beneath. I would not do it like the article shows, its just asking for it to be pulled off as it is only reliant on the bond area. Its probably sufficient for most askings, but if it really needs to be strong such as a bow cleat, i think it needs to be built more like a chainplate and the fibres need to be put in tension.
     

  9. groper
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 2,467
    Likes: 123, Points: 73, Legacy Rep: 693
    Location: australia

    groper Senior Member

    oops, didnt read it carefully and see the full idea... seems it would be perfectly ok for any deck cleat... go with it mate :)
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. WhiteDwarf
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    2,253
  2. bajansailor
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    622
  3. cando2
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    737
  4. Robert Biegler
    Replies:
    61
    Views:
    3,159
  5. Markusik
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    772
  6. fallguy
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    1,048
  7. Mark C. Schreiter
    Replies:
    29
    Views:
    1,665
  8. Scott M..
    Replies:
    61
    Views:
    4,072
  9. Smokeyr67
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    1,615
  10. Michael Hyder
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,730
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.