Completely clueless

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Qbonez, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I run a small, one man, fiberglass repair department in a maritime facility. Three years ago I bought a ten pound bag of cabo. Still a third left.
     
  2. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    I guess I was raised buying things price per ounce. Seems like it would be better to have too much than having to wait a week for more. I guess I'm just second guessing myself. But the price for a 10 pound bag is less than buying 5 single gallons. I'm torn between saving money and having just enough
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    10 pounds of bog dust on this tiny boat ? Sounds like overkill.
     
  4. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Well 5 pounds was suggested and as stated at beginning I know nothing about glassing yet. I need to peanut butter 54 linear feet of wood and assuming I need to do both sides makes it 108' of mixture
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't know what kind of fillet you have in mind, but you will have heaps left over. Then some.
     
  6. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Alright I'll get 5 gallons then. Unless people think I could get by with 15 quarts.
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I suggest you calculate the cross sectional area of this fillet you envisage, in square inches or fraction thereof, surely won't be more than 1/4 sq inch, multiply that by the total length in inches, then you have the total volume, in cubic inches. A US gallon is 231 cubic inches. Now I don't know how much this stuff compacts when wet with resin, but I think it fair to say you need much less than you anticipate. "Do the math" as they say ! :)
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Actually, an appropriate fillet is much less than 1/4 square inch sectional area, your filler requirements are quite modest.
     
  9. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I suggest starting with a pound or two. Doubt you will need three. Let alone five or ten.
     
  10. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Sounds like a plan
     
  11. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Here are some pictures of the transom. My plan is to start working on the repairs next weekend. Going to buy wood for stringers tomorrow.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    I hate to ask this, but why did you cut the transom off like that, you created a tremendous amount of work for yourself.
     
  13. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    To check if it was rotten. The bottom of boat below transom had cracks. How does this create tremendous amounts of work beyond what was planned
     
  14. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    The new glass covering the plywood must structurally tie to the bottom of the boat. Or the transom is likely to fail again soon. As soon as next voyage! Glass joints need to overlap and tapper, otherwise they "hinge" and snap at blunt edge. The transom's new glass should start at the top of transom and tuck under onto bottom and sides for 6 or more inches.
    In order for the new glass to not change the bottom' hydrological profile, the bottom and sides need to be ground away at a 12-1 angle. After the new glass is layed everything gets faired and painted

    I replace transoms from the inside. New glass ramps won't alter hull shape. New glass work will usually be hidden by interior furniture, and can be left ugly. Gravity works in my favor while tabbing to bottom.
     

  15. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    If the stringers are bad, then the entire inside of the boat needs to be gutted, once it's opened up it's easy to replace the transom from the inside with zero work to be done on the outside. Cutting it like you did creates the hardest and most time consuming repair you could do on a hull.
     
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