Completely clueless

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Qbonez, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    What I see and interpret from the OP's question about this rebuild and how he should proceed.

    He got a free boat, it's nothing special and is in bad shape (no offense intended) and he would like to get it back on the water for a reasonable amount of time, effort and money. Boats in this condition get cut up and hauled to the dump every day.

    Typically when a boat like this is fixed and put back in service the new to boating owner soon learns that they don't use it, or this isn't the exact boat for what they want to do, so it either gets neglected or sold. And since old boats, even ones that have been rebuilt, don't sell for much money, all the time and money that went into it doesn't return much, if any benefit in the sell price. Now factor in that anyone interested in buying this boat probably has no clue as to what polyester or epoxy is, and for the most part doesn't care, they want "cheap" because they don't have money or knowledge about boats.

    Plus, attention to detail plays a much larger roll in how well the repairs hold up than the exact materials used, just using epoxy doesn't make the repair any better if it's not done correctly.

    If this was a classic, or the OP had owned several boats and was now going to build his dream boat that he planned to use for a long time, plus he liked projects, then by all means use whatever resin and types of glass that make you feel good about the finished product, the longer you own and use it the more value you will see in upgrading the materials used.

    So for this project, my suggestions would be, use polyester, and for the most part just rebuild it back to like it was originally, even with sloppy construction and no attention to detail it held up to decades of abuse before being abandoned in someone's side yard. So with similar products and even a bit more attention to detail it will be around far longer than the OP has any interest in it.
     
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  2. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Great post ondarvr

    He is just realizing the economics.

    Polyester is fine, but smells bad indoors and correct me if I am wrong, requires mix adjusting for temp/humidity.

    If you would like me to remove or edit any post, let me know. I only aim to edify/help.

    OP - call my friends at boat builder central
    772-770-1225
    Or Noah's Marine.
    1-800-524-7517

    I would follow Ondarvr's advice on the 1700. You cut each piece and draw line on the center and a reference and wetout on the stringer..less resin.

    And recalc based on my fabric advice.

    Make sure you get cabosil....gonna need ? 5 gallon bucket

    I use 1 oz of resin per foot for fillet estimates, iirc.

    Whattabout the transom?
     
  3. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    I ordered the 1708 and resin. Instant buyers remorse. Cut the bottom 14? Inches or so off. Wood isn't rotten at all probably just stress cracked. Would it be conceivable to use the bottom 1/2inch of old glass for stringers?
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    First lesson learned. Never rush materials buying.

    I can't comprehend what you are asking on balance.
     
  5. Qbonez
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    Qbonez Junior Member

    Is it unwise to use old glass instead of fillet for corners?
     
  6. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    It can work, the glass needs to be in good shape though, this is where some of the original work may not be worth using. Most of the time people just remove everything and start over.
     
  7. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Yeah I figured as much. But I think it would serve as a reference to where they need to go and also hold them still
     
  8. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Seeing as how I will be doing the entire project alone. It seems to be easier that way
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You will still need some thickened resins to get the glass to lay flat.

    You don't glass over ridges.
     
  10. Qbonez
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    Qbonez Junior Member

    What do you mean by ridges
     
  11. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    When you cut the stringers out; if you leave the fillet; you are still going to have a ridge.

    In ascii,

    I
    I
    I
    I______

    I is the stringer, the underline is the hull.

    The old fillet is O.

    I
    I
    IOO
    IOOO___

    You'll need to fill in the top of the old fillet...think another O; otherwise when you lay the glass; you'd have an air pocket. Just add cabosil about 2.5 to 1 by volume to the resin and smooth out rough spots with a small trowel if you don't need to fillet fully.
     
  12. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Qbonez Junior Member

    That totally makes sense. Thanks
     
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  13. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Qbonez,

    No buyers remorse, please.
    Commit and move forward, good on 'ya.
    Please, disregard my previous post.
    I would have never said anything had I known you already ordered.
    Use the Force!
     
  14. Qbonez
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Montana

    Qbonez Junior Member

    Nah it's all good. My mom just has a way of making me second guess everything. Although if I thought I could have gothen away with just 1700 that would have saved me a bunch
     

  15. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    This post might be harsh, but read to the end.

    Honestly, you rushed your buying decision. I still don't know if your transom is rotten. You went from 'completely clueless' to 'rushing it badly'.

    If you read back through this thread, I was very clear on the differences. Had you presented the budget for each of the two choices; you would have made the right choice.

    Wetting out 1708 is harder. You will need to preroll or pre squeegee the area or table wetout and then move wetted glass.

    The good news is 1708 doesn't act like a snakeskin, so you can move it wet.

    You also need to understand cure times for poly and the nuances of using poly in temps and humidity.

    Ondarvr is your man on poly.

    Be patient and give him a chance to guide or you'll have even more trouble with things curing on you before you are wetted out.

    I can't use poly because I am building attached to my house and poly wreaks. It is used here at a minimum.
     
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