Complete newbie needs help and advice

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by a.g.turner, Aug 30, 2010.

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  1. a.g.turner
    Joined: Aug 2010
    Posts: 46
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    Location: Wovlerhampton

    a.g.turner Junior Member

    Hi all.
    I'm new to boats in general but have been keen to get involved for many years.

    I have just aquired a boat which will need lots and lots of restoration.

    I have absolutelu no idea what this boat is and i'm very aware i may be in over my head and well out of my depth - no pun intended - but i've started now so I guess I have to plug away with what i've got

    The first thing i need help with is finding out as much as possible about the boat itself

    Can anyone identify the make and model and tell me anything about the specification etc.

    Also can anyone point me in the right direction as to where to begin the restoration. My initial thoughts, as someone who knows nothing about boats but is a decent carpenter etc, is to remove all the paint and begin carefully removing the rotten wood but I may need help from a proper boat builder for this.

    Any advice greatfully received. And please don't laugh too hard at my ignorance.

    How do I go about uploading pics of the boat for identification purposes - in the meentime please look here for pics of the boat

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TMzCEwRTVo

    Many thanks

    Andy
     
  2. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    I hope they paid you well to take it away.

    Are you the Lass in the pictures?



    Here is what II would do if the boat was mine.

    Go get a Cololer full of Guiness and Ice

    remove any stainless or bronze and sort them out. Bring the scrap metal to the salvage yard.

    Bring the boat into a field, push it off the trailer, cut the Kell off with a chain saw and set aside.

    Douse the hull with 20 Gallons of old Gasoline and hit it with a flare from about 100 yards away.

    When the fire has melted down to a respectable rore. put a big kettle on and melt the lead down into sinkers.

    There you go. It was not a total loss.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. sorenfdk
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Denmark

    sorenfdk Yacht Designer

    Well... If you're prepared to spend all your spare time for the next years, and if you have access to almost unlimited amounts of money, it could be done...
    But if I were you, I'd follow wickedgood's advice.
     
  4. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    Looks like a Mason 31 , It may be savable if the frames are ok , and you are a pro wood worker.
     
  5. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Cant see the inside structure. But I see a bunch of stuff like hatches, hinges, windlass stuff that can be saved or sold. It will take lots of money to restore, does anything work? Sails, and mast ?
     
  6. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    frank smith Senior Member

    Sorry , I am wrong about Mason , maybe Griffith, but need more info .
     
  7. a.g.turner
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Wovlerhampton

    a.g.turner Junior Member

    More pics

    I can upload more pics if that helps identify it

    Is the general conclusion then that it's scrap

    That's such a shame, you know when you get all fired up about something and then discover it's not going to work - real damp squid.

    I am pretty handy as a woodworker etc but by no means a boat expert - but I am prepared to take 2 years restoring it if anyone thinks it's worth doing.

    Is it a "nice" boat or would it stil only be mediocre if it were beautifully restored?

    Andy
     
  8. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    As mentioned above:

    maybe 10% of restoration cost will be the value after several years of a shitty job.

    Leave it for goodness sake.

    Richard

    Ahh, **** and hell and damnation, these multiple threads drive me nuts !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     

  9. Jeff
    Joined: Jun 2001
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    Location: Great Lakes

    Jeff Moderator

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