Committing Brightwork Heresy

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Asleep Helmsman, Aug 31, 2020.

  1. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    I'm building a new teak door and side portholes for the Oceans. The Pearson 35.

    I'm thinking of using Interlux Schooner and top coat it with Cetol. Then you look at their web (Interlux ) it doesn't have any comparisons of longevity.

    I found a couple of articles, only one recent one mentioning this process.

    Another opting might be to use a catalyzed varnish like Perfection Plus.

    Anyone out there used both?
     
  2. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I have used Cetol quite a lot in the past - it seems to be more forgiving than varnish, and it will cover a multitude of sins.
    And it is easy to give a quick sand and then slap on another coat when need be.
    You want to put a few coats on to bare wood, let it 'soak in' - in this respect more like oil than varnish.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
  3. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Whatever you use, this is a technique I used on furniture and such to get a very nice finish with polyurethanes. First, slap on a coat like bajansailor says, that will soak in and raise the grain. Sand that off with a 120 sandpaper on a block to get rid of raised grain, bugs, dust and drips and to level the surface. Then slap on another coat or so to build up the thickness, sand again with 220 grit for the same reasons. For the last coat, do it soon enough to get a chemical bond. First use a good tack cloth and then apply a very thin layer by wiping it on with a rag/pad of folded tee shirt or a piece of fine texture foam. That coat will dry to the touch within minutes. Drips are eliminated and even if a bug or dust land on that thin coat, they don't get trapped in the varnish and create lumps. When it's dry, polish it up with a clean rag. Experiment with it.
     
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  4. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    Thank guys, but I'm really looking for a specific process.

    Anyone out there had any experience using Cetol as a top coat over varnish?
     
  5. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    I don't think this would be a very good idea - if you are going to use Cetol you should use it 'all the way', similarly if you are going to use varnish.
     
  6. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Warning I have an extreme distaste for cetol. I think it looks awful and is brightwork hersey.

    Cetol is varnish and can be combined or inter mixed.

    It contains way to much ironoxide for my taste. The massive amount of pigment occludes the wood's grain. But still degrades faster than paint. Mix a quart of paint into a gallon of varnish and you get the worst not the best charistics of either.

    If you want solid colored rust brown trim, then paint it.

    If you want to see the wood grain, then use a clear varnish.

    Putting it over traditional varnish will be easier to remove than if applied directly to teak.

    Catalyzed varnish will have a harder (scratch resistance) surface than traditional varnish. It will also be harder to touch up or remove when it needs to be refinished.

    My preference is for traditional spar varnish. It touches up the easiest. It looks so much better than that C-crap
     
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  7. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    I'm making a sample. Photos coming.
     
  8. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    I am being specific here. Cetol Gloss finish over varnish.

    Sikkens Cetol Marine Gloss https://www.bottompaintstore.com/sikkens-cetol-marine-gloss-p-28242.html?campaignid=8777250232&adgroupid=91417252787&creative=410327855459&matchtype=&network=g&device=c&keyword=&gclid=Cj0KCQjwk8b7BRCaARIsAARRTL5ZJEYP__zBqZdETkswR4iYks9hty4MYmZslBT1uGvhPAynunyidd0aArSNEALw_wcB
     

  9. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I stand by my earlier message.

    Both Interlux and Sikkim are great companies. I use some of their other products.

    I don't remember the particular Cetol product I was extremely dissatisfied with.

    Open a well shaken (yes varnish can be shaken or vigorously stired with out introducing bubbles to the finish). If you can see the bottom of the can it would receive my endorsement.
     
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