combo hammock-cape-tent-backpack-tarp and last but not least.....

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    emergency 'boat'.

    Ponchos generally suck, mostly because they make it hard to access stuff you have on your front-side. (OK, Clint Eastwood was pretty cool when he'd flip his grungy poncho up over his shoulder to reveal his six-shooter to a gang of desperadoes he was about to out-draw)

    IMO, capes are the way to go, not only due to ease of front-side access, but you can wear one and have the option of open or closed up much better than a poncho.

    Ponchos also are stuck with big hole in center, which makes secondary use as tent, tarp or boat-skin problematic.

    As a piece of all around outdoor gear, I'd like to include hammock and 'backpack' features. This would be accomplished by having the cape ex-long, with length easily adjustable. This would also solve a common compliant about ponchos used in backpacking: they are either too short to keep your backpack dry, or too long to stay clean when used w/out a big pack.

    When worn as standard knee length cape about 3ft of material would be folded up which would then create about 15" tall pouch on your back for carrying stuff. The 3ft and 15" could be adjusted for size of load, position on wearer's back, or even split into 2 or more folds to separate cargo. This wouldn't be meant to replace a real ergo-metric pack, just to carry random stuff like laundry, small children laying down, dead fish and birds you just bagged, etc.

    For a hammock, just use it full length, using provided re-enforced eyelets, pull cords, etc. Bonus for allowing for both stick-braced "flat" hammock and regular backpacking style.

    Last but not least, as an emergency "boat" of sorts. Saw a video about US Army boot camp where on their 3 day final they were required to cross a river and keep their gear dry but bundling it all up inside their ponchos and floating it across keeping only their underwear on while swimming. Interesting concept, and I think a larger cape without a hole in the center would work much better, and maybe a plan could be developed to use a few saplings as a frame to make something able to carry a person and their gear.

    Soviet Army cape/tent. More tent/tarp than cape.Russian red army soldier rain cloak - tent military poncho made in USSR + GIFT | eBay https://www.ebay.com/i/322222792763?chn=ps

    I'm wanting something much more cape than tent. Probably with dedicated hood piece, maybe separate detachable hood/hat piece. Something that would be your go-to cape/overcoat for daily wear, rather than using a tarp as 'cape'.

    Design Desirability Feature rank:

    1)everyday cape/overcoat. Can't have all these other features causing people to not wear it. Instead it should allow people to skimp on other gear because they've got their super-hero cape handy. Should also self contain into tiny backpack, purse or mini-duffle.█ █ Travel Drawstring Backpack Sack Gym Waterproof School Sport Shoulder Bags | eBay https://www.ebay.com/itm/Travel-Drawstring-Backpack-Sack-Gym-Waterproof-School-Sport-Shoulder-Bags/332419879445?hash=item4d65c4d215:m:moD1tEFA6yfd0Y7TSAS48LQ

    2)outer sleeping bag-bag/bivy-sack.New Adult Travel Camping Mountain Sleeping Bag Arm Holes Slots Leg Separate | eBay https://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Adult-Travel-Camping-Mountain-Sleeping-Bag-Arm-Holes-Slots-Leg-Separate/112037218685?hash=item1a15f0497d:m:mXy3Tv7w_C9VRuXMcvJf61A

    They also make these with zipper on the very bottom so you can hobble around with boots on. Cinched Neck Tactical Sleeping Bag with Permanently Attached Fully Insulated Arm | eBay https://www.ebay.com/itm/Cinched-Neck-Tactical-Sleeping-Bag-with-Permanently-Attached-Fully-Insulated-Arm/152186981603?epid=1119618819&hash=item236f0d0ce3:g:AJAAAOSwTZ1XnGRZ

    3)"backpack", especially for casual carry of quick access light or bulky items and keeping them dry....or even carrying water or sopping wet items.


    THEN, much less important......

    4)tent/tarp, including ganging them together.

    5)hammock, should include cords for easy deployment as hammock/tent and general adjustment as cape. Should be able to, without taking off cape, hook cords from back/head/top to one object, then cords from feet/bottom to another object, then pull and winch yourself into comfortable hammock position. Also hanging storage.

    6)emergency boat/coracle using a few sapling type structural members, or at least a GI style floating bundle, but much more streamlined and suitable for extra cargo behind canoe or kayak. Envisioned use might be floating quartered moose with a bunch of party balloons together for shape and buoyancy.

    Yes, water-proof VS breath-ability would be an issue with a garment that is suppose to serve as maximum weather protection or boat skin AND all night hammock or bivy sack. I'm thinking Gore-Tex with mesh liner.

    PS- custom insulated inner liner would be an option, of coarse, but should be able to exploit standard US GI Woobie "poncho liner" dimensions and attachments, and do it much better than the GI poncho, due to lack of center head-hole in a cape. Why The Woobie Is The Greatest Military Invention Ever Fielded http://taskandpurpose.com/why-the-woobie-is-the-greatest-military-invention-ever-fielded/
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
  2. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    For a make-shift boat skin take a couple of ponchos or a tarp rectangular tarp (fabric = water tight). Other materials you note above will leak.

    1. Fabricate half a dozen or so longitudinal frames of approx 8ft long. Tie them off at the ends.
    2. Tie the bow/stern ends together with a strong line/rope to establish the desired rocker. Larger rocker needed for a white water crossing. Flatwater (smooth) can use less rocker.
    3. Spread the longitudinal frames apart and lash at least a dozen cross frames. Port & starboard gunwales sides should be parallel. Frames should be equally spaced. Tie off all joints with strong, waterproof twine (e.g. paracord, nylon or suitable natural twine).
    4. Stretch the poncho/tarp snug over the frame and stitch it along the gunwales. Absolutely no holes below the waterline are allowed (for obvious reasons).

    Assuming you already have a paddle, stuff in your gear and cross the river with all due speed (assuming savages are on your tail and preparing to BBQ you for dinner).

    You can use this make-shift vessel for a shelter too by flipping it upside down and resting on support beams. Sleep in it too. Save your other gear for other uses as this is all you need for a boat. I would not advise using the poncho/tarp for any other purpose than rain/weather shelter. Sleeping in it, using for backpack, etc will eventually damage the water integrity. Your boat will sink and the piranhas or crocodiles will eat you alive. This is all bushcraft 101 stuff. If you don't have these skills or materials the wild beasts will just eat you alive. Good luck.
     
  3. wavepropulsion
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    wavepropulsion Pirate Member


    A piece of tarp is useful also to collect rain or condensation water.
     
  4. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Here's a good example of a small tarp boat/canoe. You can escape grizzly bears if you paddle this full throttle.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Got any pics of this sort of frame that has been fabricated in the bush? I'm thinking the tapering nature of saplings could be used to overlap them 2/3 with the small flexible 1/3 on the ends, that the 1/3 could be bent up to give distinct bow and stern, with the doubled thicker 2/3 making a strong flat keel. The rest of the longitudinal frames would be slightly thinner, and maybe overlapped 1/3. The cross frames would be made into U-shapes with bow-string, then inserted to spread the long-frames and tied.

    I've been really impressed at how GoreTex stands up to rough use and still maintains its water-proof (yet breathable) properties. I'm talking holding standing water for days waterproof tests. But I guess one could hedge bets and use a space-blanket as outer skin, with the tougher GoreTex providing support and double hull.

    I forgot to mention an additional cape mode would be as a free standing shelter with either/or inflatable or flexible structure. The mesh lining would have rows of stitching to create channels that would accept long balloons (as used by clowns to make funny animals) More robust inflatables always an option. I'd want to be able to sit in it with my weight securing the base, then have supports on the sides and back form a tall dome. People could completely do their Hair & Makeup under the dome in the rain, and not have their flattop or B-52 matted down.
     
  6. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    I tell you what Squidly Diddly, there's a zillion videos of skin on frame canoes & kayaks on YouTube. You're essentially doing the same with improvised frames/limbs, twine & a make-shift waterproof skin. These boats are very light and you can portage them easily. Bear in mind you're probably not going to be using inverted pre-cut station frames to maintain the shape of the hull. In the bush you'll need to bend the frames and hold them by manually lashing them, inserting temporary spacer limbs, etc. to get the shape you want. It's definitely dialing back all the formalities of creating a perfect hull shape based on station frames.

     
  7. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Here's one that's right up your alley. This young lad has done a fine job...with Gorilla tape. Whatever meets your mission requirements!

     
  8. mick_allen
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    mick_allen -

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  9. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    That's one big cloak LOL. Lots of good examples out there. Pre-dating fabrics the Eskimo's used actual animal skins. They were sewn into panels and stretched & fastened to wooden frames. My all time favorite is the King Island kayak. These were used by Eskimos who paddled them out to rocky volcanic islands along the Bering Strait. Sometimes these islands were 30ft up in the air. When sea creatures came through the straits (e.g. Walrus) they would jump in their kayaks. Two people would pick up the bow & stern and toss them into the ocean. Imagine being tossed over a 30ft cliff into the roaring, frigid Bering Strait. This is by far the toughest of kayaks...many frames used. Very strong boat. Made to do the classic "Eskimo roll".

    King Island (Bering Strait) http://www.arctickayaks.com/Plans/PlansBeringSeaRTW-1.htm
     
  10. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    He was screwed until he found the Gorilla Tape trees.

    And he walked right past the Birch bark trees.
     
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  11. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    Precisely ;)
     
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