Coated stays - pros and cons

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by rwatson, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It depends on how the vinyl is applied. Often the wire is simply pulled through a sheath, which just collects moisture and holds it against the wire. Wire that is bathed in liquid vinyl lasts a bit longer if left static after installation, but on a boat where the tension will go up and down with regular cycling, the dissimilar expansion rates will break the bond and moisture will get trapped against the wire.
     
  3. bpw
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    bpw Senior Member

    Makes inspection impossible. Coated life lines are not allowed in offshore racing for this reason, as well as those mentioned by PAR. Adds weight aloft too.
     
  4. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    That makes some sense. On the other hand, stainless steel is noted for have invisible breaks.

    I seem to remember reading that a broken strand on galvanized wire will stand up as 'meat hooks' and be seen, while breaks in stainless can hide down amongst the other strands.

    In any event, the problem areas seam to be near swages and other fittings, where there wouldnt be any covering.

    Juts for my owne references, I add
    http://www.easyrigging.com/upload/files/EasyRigging brochure.pdf

    with discussions on Aramid and PBO fibres - which would make covering moot.
     
  5. bpw
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    bpw Senior Member

    We used dyneema (dynex Dux) on our boat for standing rigging. One of its great benefits is that is fuzzes up into a big wad of fibers when it chafes so damage us very obvious, even from down on deck.
     

  6. SukiSolo
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    SukiSolo Senior Member

    Always fun when the breaks are inside the end swaged fittings....;)
     
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