Closed end rivets

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by danilo, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. danilo
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: suriname

    danilo Junior Member

    Hi guys,

    I am wondering how good the closed end rivets are to re-rivet a aluminum boat.
    Does anyone have any experience with this ?
    I'm gathering info because i wanna re-rivet a aluminum boat.
    Do they form a water tight construction ? What is the expected lifespan compared to the original rivets ?

    Thanks
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,613
    Likes: 383, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    What is a closed end rivet?
     
  3. Paul Anthony
    Joined: Jun 2007
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 52
    Location: Orlando

    Paul Anthony Junior Member

    [​IMG]

    A closed end, blind, pop rivet. I would recommend a high strength version for sheet aluminum or any soft, thin material. I worked at Fastenal for several years
     
    2 people like this.
  4. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,301
    Likes: 94, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

  5. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 7,765
    Likes: 273, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The steel mandrel type would have to be excluded for sure. Need to talk to a manufacturer to find out about what alloys ( or pure aluminium) are available best suited to the job. I have never seen a rivetted aluminium boat with pop rivets, whether that is just a cosmetic thing, I don't know. The tolerances for diameter and roundness of the hole would be pretty tight to stay watertight, I think. Sounds like a tough job.
     
  6. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,301
    Likes: 94, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    1 person likes this.
  7. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 7,765
    Likes: 273, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Hmmm...I dunno. That video was pretty damned unimpressive, no close ups at all. Riveted aluminium boats went out with valve radios in Australia, everything from the mid 60's on was welded, below waterline anyhow. I suspect pop rivets need something stronger than alloy mandrels to pull them up nice and tight. OK for temporary repairs, maybe, with pop rivets, but if there was a pop rivet system that worked for boats long term we'd have seen it on production boats where rivets are still in fashion, like north America.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,301
    Likes: 94, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    I agree... , solid rivets are superior, a fresh pop rivet has to be better than a dead solid rivet, the vid is pretty light weight I thought too- maybe I missed a winky face there;). Welded/stretch formed & pressed panel boats seem to be a pretty well evolved production technique, an old Mates Dad was part founder of Quintrex & had an interest until the 70s, there's plenty of veteran welded "Fishabouts" still serving their owners well. All the best from Jeff.
     
  9. danilo
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: suriname

    danilo Junior Member

    Thanks guys
    guess i have to talk to the manufacturer to find out more
    about the application of closed end rivets.
    Still,if there is someone out here with experience with c.e. rivets
    please let me know.
     
  10. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,613
    Likes: 383, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    I've used them for repairs on light boats, like canoes. I don't think they are adequate for the whole re-rivet job. It is not that difficult to peen rivets with a hammer and a backing iron, just time consuming.
     
  11. danilo
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: suriname

    danilo Junior Member

    Thanks gonzo,
    I think i'm gonna go for the solid rivets after all.
    Like you say you get a better job just add a little more time.
     
  12. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
    Posts: 2,301
    Likes: 94, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 871
    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    You may be able to make some simple tooling for a cheap small air hammer- with the inlet pressure regulated carefully to speed the process up.
     
  13. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,613
    Likes: 383, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    When you get the hang to peening rivets, it goes pretty fast. It will be the same as copper rivets in a wooden boat.
     
  14. ancient kayaker
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 3,497
    Likes: 146, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2291
    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    I’m not sure I would want to fill a boat with water just to see if it leaks; that puts a considerable strain on the hull especially if its fastenings are already suspect. Much easier to take a wax crayon out next time I use it and mark the leaks on the inside . . .

    Shouldn’t backing washers be used on soft materials like Al?
     

  15. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,613
    Likes: 383, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Rivets should have an adequate size head.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.