CLC PocketShip, Schreyer CROW, or ... ? Looking at home builts < 16'

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Mark Sumner, May 26, 2020.

?

If you were building a tiny cruiser for the heckuvit, which would you pick?

  1. PocketShip

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. CROW

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Something else

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. Mark Sumner
    Joined: May 2020
    Posts: 3
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    Location: Missouri

    Mark Sumner New Member

    I've built a small skiff, and I regularly sail a very small sailboat (my 1984 Howmar Phantom, basically an old Sunfish clone). Now I'm looking to build something for fun that looks a little more ... shipish.

    As it happens, I live on a small lake, so I have a handy spot to dunk anything I build and test it out. However, there's a 16' limit for boats on the lake. So, even though I definitely plan to drop whatever I build on a trailer and take it places more interesting than my backyard, I'm taking that 16' as a limit on this project.

    I've looked at CLC's PocketShip, which is lovely. And at Roy Schreyer's CROW, which is decidedly un-lovely, but packs a lot of boat into 15'8" (it also helps that I've watched a build video on the CROW and seen it constructed without the use of tools I don't own or skills that seem vastly out of my range).

    Still, I'd like to hear what else might fit in the category of these little boats. Must be under 16', have something of a cabin, and be capable of operating with a shallow draft in a pinch, While much of the lake is > 25' deep, the area right around my dock is only around 3-4' and can get lower in the midst of a dry summer. And the boat should also sail well and be up for something more adventurous than just my lake. Like, say, a trip to the Texas 200.

    Oh, and it must be build-able for someone whose skill set includes enough woodworking to build a deck or a shed, but not the skill to hand carve a violin.

    Suggestions? Kit build or plan build are both okay.
     
  2. Dolfiman
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: France

    Dolfiman Senior Member

  3. Mark Sumner
    Joined: May 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Missouri

    Mark Sumner New Member

    Thanks, Dolfiman. It's certainly a very attractive little boat. And it's impressive that so many have been built (of the older form). What they show of the design seems straightforward, and the use of a weighted keel and centerboard rather than a leeboard certainly helps make the boat appear more capable--even if it also seems a bit of threat to my skills. My French isn't up to some of the details. I believe I'll give them a nudge and see if the study plans are available in English as well as seek out any videos of a new model under construction.

    If nothing else, I'm acquiring a library of study plans, which in itself is no bad thing.
     
  4. Dolfiman
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: France

    Dolfiman Senior Member

    It is said that "a translation into English is possible. Ask the designer" :
    Contact | François Vivier, naval architect http://www.vivierboats.com/en/contact-en/

    In complement in case of, photos and comments (in French) of the successive steps of an home building of a Maraudeur, photos at least can give you an idea of the various tasks and skills involved. To note that the home builder here took the option to draw and cut himself the plywood panels with a jigsaw :
    Project genesis :
    Construction amateur d’un Maraudeur de J.J. Herbulot et François Vivier https://www.bateaux.com/article/30123/construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur-de-j-j-herbulot-francois-vivier
    Setting up the building site :
    Construction amateur d’un Maraudeur, mise en place du chantier https://www.bateaux.com/article/30125/construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur-mise-place-chantier
    The planking, in one ply 6mm (for the flat or developable panels) or 2 x ply 3mm (for the rounded bilge) :
    Construction amateur d’un Maraudeur, le bordage de la coque https://www.bateaux.com/article/30217/construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur-bordage-de-coque
    The roof , deck, floors, daggerboard, rudder, … :
    Construction amateur d’un Maraudeur, enfin un rouf ! https://www.bateaux.com/article/30293/construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur-enfin-un-rouf
    The painting, the lead ballast :
    Construction amateur d’un Maraudeur, de la couleur pour la coque https://www.bateaux.com/article/30367/construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur-de-couleur-coque
    The rig, the first launch :
    Construction amateur d’un Maraudeur, enfin les premiers bords https://www.bateaux.com/article/30440/construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur-enfin-premiers-bords
    The stability test, the flooding test, the final building time (650 h within 1,5 year) and final cost (7520 Euros) :
    Bilan chiffré de la construction amateur d’un Maraudeur https://www.bateaux.com/article/30558/bilan-chiffre-de-construction-amateur-d-un-maraudeur
    A 1964 Maraudeur, still in great shape, as the sailor and his dog :
     
  5. Will Gilmore
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 102
    Likes: 21, Points: 18
    Location: Littleton, nh

    Will Gilmore Senior Member

    Last edited: May 28, 2020

  6. Mark Sumner
    Joined: May 2020
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Missouri

    Mark Sumner New Member

    Thanks, Will. Looks very neat as an open boat. I need to get a better look at one built with a cuddy to see what kind of space it provides, but I definitely like the look.
     
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