class rules for sailing yachts

Discussion in 'Class Societies' started by Minthihakyaw, Apr 30, 2015.

  1. Minthihakyaw
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    Minthihakyaw Junior Member

    hello hi,
    I'm new to this forum. I want to know under what class rules sailing boats are designed. I'm novice in this field. I'm seriously interested in boat designs. Please educate me more.:rolleyes:
    best wishes,
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    You should first start with > bcya.com/Misc/BasicRacingRules.pdf <. There are countless classes, falling under many sets of rules, some unique, others a specific umbrella. The PDF listed are the sailing rules, but many classes have defined limits, which affect design, such as the IOR (and many others).
     
  3. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Are you asking about "class" as in a grouping of boats for racing such as Star class or IOR, or "class" as in a set of rules governing the design and construction of a boat such as ABS or ISO?
     
  4. Minthihakyaw
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    Minthihakyaw Junior Member

    Thank you for answering me. I mean which class is the best for designing and construction for a sailing boat.
     
  5. JSL
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    JSL Senior Member

    Try Lloyd's, ABS, etc. I assume you are doing a larger boat~ over 9m
     
  6. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    ISO rules are the legal requirement for recreational boats up to 24m in length sold in the EU, and are also used elsewhere. http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_ics/catalogue_ics_browse.htm?ICS1=47&ICS2=80 They have generally replaced other "class" rules for recreational boats under 24m. In the US the ABYC standards are widely followed on a voluntary basis, though they are not comprehensive.

    Edit: Principles of Yacht Design 4th Edition includes a good overview of parts of the ISO standards for sailing yachts.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2015
  7. Minthihakyaw
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    Minthihakyaw Junior Member

    Thank david , i got good information.
     
  8. MikeJohns
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Adding to the info already posted:

    The idea of using class ( classification society) is to get your design checked and if you require, they also oversee construction. Plan design approval is a very good service for a new designer.

    ISO is not a classification society but a construction standard. Class rules are also harmonised with ISO. There are organisations that check ISO plans for compliance.

    There are a few classification societies that cover smaller sailing craft, most simply tell you to use ISO. From memory the societies that do cover smaller craft are GL ( Germany ), BV (France), and RINA (Italy).

    I use GL ( now DNV GL) they are a good set of rules. BV I have found to be very sloppy , unless you are getting your design checked don't design to their rules some of the errors I have found are appalling . I have had nothing to do with RINA so cannot comment on them.

    Whatever you use, use current versions. The commonly used older ABS rules ( USA) were deficient and poorly engineered for some types of construction. Deck design pressures even for the last version produced were deficient and ABS now directs designers to ISO which is basically a fixed version of ABS OSRY.
     
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  9. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Agreed and woeful in some areas.

    The natural opposite to BV. Seriously over the top in some locations. Yet when using another Class rule to provide evidence to show their own rules being some twice the requirement, if not more, than others, they accept? Which suggests they know their rules are just as sloppy as BV's. Doesn't give one confidence.

    LR rules are good too, if over 24m. Below, then the values become a bit suspect, and as Mike noted above, unless you're building to Class, hard to get justification for a reduction to provide your client if you are just using LR rules rather than getting formal approval.
     
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