Chrysler 26 Swing Keel

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Guest, Jan 21, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    How do I know when my swing keel is fully retracted so I do not over crank the winch? I am concerned about breaking the cable connections.
    Thank You
    Don K.
     
  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    i will assume that the boat is in the water... otherwise you would know when the keel is fully winched up. it's pretty obvious by the feel of the handle when it's hit the stops

    can you enter the water to physically observe the position of the keel?

    i sail an old MacGregor Venture 21. my procedure is to count the number of revolutions on the winch. i worked up a table that relates the numer of turns (from all-the-way-down) to the angle of the keel -- being able to vary the depth of the keel is a great aid on light-air days
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,164
    Likes: 547, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Put a mark on the cable. There are several options. For example, you can put a nicopress ball fitting. Also you could put a strip of leather or rope spliced into the cable. Paint works but doesn't last as long. The advantage of a mark is that your crew can do the job too.
     
  4. kayaxi
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Greensboro, NC

    kayaxi Junior Member

    Chrysler 26 Mushy Deck

    Hey guys, this seems an appropriate forum... I'm looking at a '76 26' Chrysler Sailboat (swing keel). They're asking $4,000 for it although they've already said they'd come down since it needs ALOT of cleaning inside and out. Sound hull, electronics seem fine, has a trailer, all the sails seem good, but there's a mushy spot on the deck next to the mast step. Feels about 6 - 8 inches or so of soft area. It's not VERY noticeable but enough to make me wonder if this could become a MAJOR problem in the future. It flexes about 1/4 inch when I put my full weight on it (165#).

    1). Do you think it's a good deal providing a good survey shows no more major flaws?

    2). Can I drill a small hole and inject some filler to put an end to the mushy deck problem?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. It's hard to find good sources on the net for fiberglass repair. I know I saw a good site recently but I seem to have lost the link. Anyway, I wonder if this is something I could do fairly easily myself. Ideas? Suggestions?
     
  5. grampianman
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: sw florida

    grampianman Junior Member

    Mushy core

    I've got a 1973 Grampian 23 which has a number of core 'issues'. It sounds like the core under the mast step has deterioriated because of water untrusion through the crack. I was initially intimidated by the thought of re-coring, but the price of the boat was right. There are some good websites which graphically present the recoring process and has bolstered my confidence in the recoring of my sailboat. www.triton381.com is far and away one of the best sites I have come across for talking about fixing up an older 'lady'. If you are reasonably confident in working with wood and epoxy/fibreglass, and have the time/understanding partner (read wife), I certainly recommend the fixer-upper route.
    Cheers,
    Ian
     
  6. kayaxi
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Greensboro, NC

    kayaxi Junior Member

    Thanks for the link Ian. Looks like a great site. The price is too right to pass up I think, considering that besides that one spot next to the mast step the only other work I need to do is basic cleaning and refinishing the teak trim and replacing a rope or two. Do you think I have a while to deal with the mushy spot or is this a "DO IT NOW" situation? The lake it will live on for the next couple of years is far from the coast and 20mph winds is the best I could probably hope for. I'd just much rather do the work after winter when I can work a little more comfortably and don't have to worry about curing time for the epoxy and such.
     
  7. grampianman
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 11
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: sw florida

    grampianman Junior Member

    Further thoughts on a mushy deck

    I sail in SW Florida where the winds rarely exceed 20 mph. I have not encountered any problems in the past year sailing in the various winds (read structural problems/rigging problems), and I have been out in some quite gusty conditions early in the year. I do keep an eye on the amount of rigging sag, and so far, so good. In your case, is the mushy deck just beside the mast, or when you thump the deck with a rubber hammer, is the sound different just to one side of the deck? If you have confidence that the area under the mast is good, then, no problem. I would want to know what is the thickness of the deck which in turn would tell me the most the rig could compress onto the compression post (unless your mast is a through-deck one. My mast sits on a tabernacle which is an aluminum U about 10 inches long which is fastened through the deck and backed by a mahogany compression post. Here is the disclaimer. My plans do not involve any offshore out-of-sight-of-land type sailing until I get deck and cabin recoring done. Water tightness and safety issues. So if you are in a place where heaven forbid, something like the rig coming down happens, at least you can always motor home. I've not sailed as much as I have this past year, and have thoroughly enjoyed the boat. I have learned a lot about her idiosyncracies and hope to make changes when I eventually haul her. And I do keep a close eye on the rig, deck, and everything else.
    It's a long reply to your message, but I hope it helps.
    Cheers, and Happy Thanksgiving,
    Ian
    Grampian 23, Wing and a Prayer
     
  8. kayaxi
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 14
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Greensboro, NC

    kayaxi Junior Member

    Yes, that does set my mind at ease a bit. There isn't a huge difference in sound from one spot to the next which makes me think the delamination isn't too bad yet. it's a fairly small area and hasn't spread far at this point. As with yours, mine has a tabernacle supported by a compression post. I haven't taken out the bulkheads and looked at it but there seems to be no problem with things being out of alignment below. The interior is bone dry and I don't see any signs of water seeping though any of the through fittings.
    So I'll do my general cleaning and polishing and save the real nasty work for when things warm up a bit. Thanks again for all the advice and encouragement!
     
  9. gerry
    Joined: Feb 2004
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: usa

    gerry New Member

    swing keel depth indicator

    I've deviced a way to know the position of the keel at all times very simply.
    I mounted a clear tube on the keel well facing the door, that way I can see it from the cockpit easily, then I wounded a piece of fishing line to the winch shaft, thru a small hole on the wood. At the other end of the fishing line, attached a sinker painted in red runing inside the clear tube.
    On the wood I placed some markings 2, 3, 4, and 5 ft.
    Now finaly I have an idea of the keel depth.
     
  10. texas26
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tx

    texas26 New Member

    chrysler 26 trailering issues

    to whom it may concern i bought a 26 a while back and need to get it out of the water to fiberglass a spot inside the cabin ontop of the keel ,A friend loaned me a trailer to which when o loaded it it was putting major pressure in the center of the boat almost as it may blow holes in either sides does anyone have a photo of a trailer or specs on the trailers that were designed for a 78 chrys 26 thank you,,,,,
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Fitting a trailer isn't especially difficult Texas, though some experience is helpful. If you don't have much of this, then help would be the reasonable option, as the specs you are looking for just don't exist. Generally, the boat should rest solely on it's keel, with the weight of the boat on rollers along the centerline of the boat. On each side of the boat are bunks, who's only job is to keep the boat from flopping over when traveling down the road. The bunks shouldn't have much weight on them at all.
     
  12. texas26
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Tx

    texas26 New Member

    thank u my friend

    as right as you are the keel was 7 inchs off the trailer and as wrong as it looked it was i will try this in the am and it will work thank you for the convidence thanks Brent Haff...
     
  13. Guillaume C.
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 22
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Qu├ębec,Canada

    Guillaume C. Junior Member

    Do not sit the Crysler 26' directly on the swing keel as it does not retract completely in the keel trunk. Have some wood piece so the weigh of the boat sit on the bottom of the shallow keel formed by hull. Once it sit and is not moving, the swing keel itself should not be in contact with anything, at this time you can also lower it ( probably only a few inchs) so that this weigh support itself and it not putting any strain on the rest of the boat. For the hull itself I used 4 adjustable post, just like on a cradle, plus a smaller one centered under the bow, plus a fixed stop at the bow-eye.

    Here's two picture of the trailer

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/__1Tt1TkRugM/SlAnczKmVLI/AAAAAAAAAXg/688kpRilG_M/s1600-h/240b.JPG

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/__1Tt1TkRugM/SlAnUiH1bvI/AAAAAAAAAXY/yvSMjnGPNRE/s1600-h/240a.JPG

    Do you know the Chrysler forum? You MUST go there if you have a Chrysler!

    http://www.chryslersailors.com/discussion/viewforum.php?f=2&sid=8b0f58dfc619f0481e7bb5233b81dd8e

    feel free to email me if you have any question about these boat, I have digged down to the bottom of the keel trunk in mine;P

    sir_guillaumecote@hotmail.com
     

  14. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,216
    Likes: 40, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    26 trailer

    We used to put the 26' swing keel models on trailers with heavy 16' bunks, well supported. The keel was just blocked to carry its own weight. The 26 is fairly "thin skinned" yet fairly heavy overall so attention to bunk shape and placement is important. I would use a hoist to position it on the trailer the first time and adjust it properly. If you have a sail drive model, be careful with the lifting straps, and tie them off so they can't slip- a 26 is very rounded. The soft decks were common, and repairable. B
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.