Chris Craft barrel back 19 engine?

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by Sculpture767, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Sculpture767
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 9
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Australia

    Sculpture767 Junior Member

    Might be better to find a common V8 in australia. Had a mate drop in out of the blue, and he thinks he can get me a something suitable. It seems to be who you know not what you know sometimes that helps get the project happening!
     
  2. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 2,925
    Likes: 66, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 719
    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    yep
    after the US Australia is the next best place in the world to pick up a V8 and marine conversion parts for them all as well ( but not all USCG approved or would be if they applied)
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Some of these went in to MGB's too (hardtops only I think), though with pollution controls where choked down badly in the late 70's early 80's. Some simple tuning and the 135 HP could jump to 250 with no problem, turning an MGB into a fine little car, even if you didn't have elbow room or a reliable suspension and still had to tolerate Lucas electrics.
     
  4. Alumination
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 84
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: -7
    Location: Knoxville, Tennessee

    Alumination Junior Member

    From a power to weight perspective, the aluminum block / heads GM LS series of engines is hard to beat but the availability and cost Down Under might work against you.

    Another dreamy V8 is the 4.0 liter Lexus/Toyota 1UZFE. They seem to be pretty plentiful at a junk yard as they never seem to die and don't easily retro fit into a Honda Civic. A little heavier and bigger outside dimensions than the LS series from GM, around 265hp/torque with the miserable OE exhaust manifolds, non-interference valve train up to 1997 and were even used in some boat applications in some parts of the world including OZ. Could be used with the factory fuel injection or I have heard there are carburetor conversions available. Same firing order as the LS series which has a delightful rumble and roar, definitely something to consider with a vintage vessel.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk0iR_KSxpQ

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yW1BTV7yiME

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRViiWdfDsA
     
  5. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 5,023
    Likes: 512, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 1485
    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    (Digression into engine history, ignore if not interested.)

    The GM 3800 V6 started as the 1962 Buick V6. It was originally used as a lower cost alternative to the 215 aluminum V8. It was based on the 215 V8 architecture and geometry less two cylinders with larger bore and longer stroke. It's displacement was 192 cubic inches, had an iron block but only weighed about 35 lbs more than the aluminum 215 V8. In 1964 Buick dropped the 215 aluminum V8 and introduced the 300 iron V8 with the same architecture and geometry as the 215 aluminum V8 and the iron V6. The bore and stroke were increased compared to the previous V6, and the 1964 V6 also used the larger bore and stroke which increased the displacement to 225 cubic inches.

    Buick used the V6 through 1967 and then the tooling and production equipment was sold to Kaiser Jeep. After AMC purchased Jeep the V6 was dropped by Jeep in 1972. GM bought back the tooling and production equipment and reintroduced the engine in 1974 but with enlarged bore which increased the displacement to 231 cubic inches / 3.8 liter. The V6 went through several redesigns and stayed in production through until 2008 with over 25 million produced.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The LS is an expensive way to go, though has much more potential then the Buick and especially the Toyota 1UZFE, which is 100 pounds heavier. There are lots of choices, I just have a soft spot for these old Buicks, which are really small, particularity compared to a Toyota 1UZFE or LS.
     
  7. Alumination
    Joined: Oct 2013
    Posts: 84
    Likes: 2, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: -7
    Location: Knoxville, Tennessee

    Alumination Junior Member

    ....but that vintage American V6 drone is miserable, possibly the worst. American V-10 and the Subaru semi-flat 4 are in the hunt too but maybe that's just me.

    The LS series from GM is very compact, I'm curious how they measure up dimension wise to the vintage Buick. If an LS engine is readily available in Australia then I'd definitely go that route.
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The LS is bigger in every dimension than the Buick/Olds 215, but there's a huge displacement potential difference. You can punch out an LS to 427 CID, while a Buick would be pushing liner thickness at 315. Displacement is power, so if you can afford the room and weight penalty (which is much) the LS is the choice, assuming you have the kind of cash necessary for one.

    Agreed the 90 degree V6 just sounds terrible. The V10 takes some getting use to, but can be acceptable. The Subaru copy of the VW flat 4 sounds like - well - pissed bees, stuck in a tin can.
     
  9. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
    Posts: 2,925
    Likes: 66, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 719
    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, but what do they cost, particularly compared to an LT. Of course there's a significant weight difference, which is why I recommend the Land Rover 285 CID, which full up is less than 400 pounds, including oil, water pump and induction. You're limited in output with these, but in this boat you don't need all that much.
     
  11. boat fan
    Joined: Sep 2008
    Posts: 717
    Likes: 17, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 435
    Location: Australia

    boat fan Senior Member


    Not to mention brakes .....LOL:rolleyes:

    I had two of these Paul , they don`t stop too good...LOL
     

  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 488, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's a brake upgrade that bolts onto the late model MGB, that is a must if you're tossing a V8 in one. I've seen a couple of versions. One uses a Honda 11.5" rotor and the caliper of your choice (strongly recommend a Wilwood upgrade), but I used a 12" GM rotor with a 2 piston caliper (I'm cheap), which worked well, unless racing, where I would have needed a 4 piston.

    With the body parts now available for these puppies, you could build an all 'glass MGB, a 2x3 tube frame, Jag, Mercedes or Vette IRS under it's butt and pull it all together for about one ton. 250 HP on this setup is 8 pounds per HP, placing it in the 1970 Hemi Cuda column, except it can handle. If you went with a LS and took the weight penalty, but just a mild 350 HP, now you're in the 6.2 pounds per HP bracket, which will hurt your eyeballs under acceleration. And if you're like me, a still mild mannered 450 HP LS knocks you into Shelby Cobra (original) territory at less than 5 pounds per HP. Now that's cooking with gas.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.