Chris Craft barrel back 19 engine?

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by Sculpture767, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Sculpture767
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    Sculpture767 Junior Member

    I'm in the early stages of planing my first boat build, that being a Chris Craft Barrel back, and was interested in some feedback as to the most suitable V8 for such a build. The fuel consumption being a factor in choosing the engine..... Although I still want to have fun!

    Thanks Sam.
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The original Chris Craft Barrel back was powered with a model M 6 cylinder, generating 130 HP. Who did you get the plans from? I hope it's not "Classic Wooden Boat Plans".

    Simply put you can toss a lot of power at this old puppy and not do much except make her unstable and whip a bunch of water into a froth, as it tries vainly to go faster.

    I've seen 200 HP in these, though they run just as fast on 160 HP. The most suitable V8 would be a light one, which translates into speed, so an LS Chevy, though tuning one down to 200 HP seems a waste. Another option would a Land Rover 285 or Buick 215 (same basic casting), which can produce 200 HP easily and is lighter then the new gen small block. The modular engine family from Ford was offered in aluminum, so a 281 or 302 would be easy enough to find.

    Many folks use a GM 4L 181 CID, which will make 185 HP. A V6 is a more common option to see and several of these can be employed.

    If you must have the V8 thump, the venerable small block Chevy (LT) will do, though a significant weight penalty with these iron blocks, which eats into speed potential.

    Lastly remember these hulls weren't designed for big power and frankly can't handle it. The hull shape runs into a drag hump at certain speeds, where instability and other issues quickly rear up their ugly heads. They do make great "bar hoppers" much like owning a well chopped out Harley, but you don't want to push them too hard or they bite.
     
  3. Sculpture767
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    Sculpture767 Junior Member

    Thanks again Par, yeah it would probably be better being a V8 as I may want to sell. Will look at power to weight ratio and go from there. The hull design may be altered if required as I have plenty of expertise helping with timber work....
    Buy the way are the Glen-L plans better?
    Cheers Sam
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Who's going to make these "alterations"?

    I don't know which plans you have, so it's hard to compare. Most of the plans for this boat are modeled after the the 1940. Even Chris Craft made adjustments to the bottom during it's model run. Lastly some of the plans have been modified, and the modification can be arbitrary, some just stupid, while other are cosmetic. This is the problem building to a model where original plans don't exist, you pretty much get everyone's interpretation, some less desirable than others.
     
  5. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Hi Par

    Whose engine was that old 6 that Chris Craft used?
    thanks
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The model M was the Chris Craft variant of the Hercules JXD.
     
  7. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Since Sculpture767 is in Australia I assume a GM Buick/Holden 3.8 V6 should be readily available.
     
  8. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    http://www.kmrolco.com
     
  9. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    thanks
    they are still kicking, wow
    www.herculesengine.com
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've built a 285 CID Buick (aluminum 215 w/ 300 crank), very light for the power they generate.

    The Old Hercules engines are pretty heavy for their modest output. If I was looking to build one of these I'd look into one of the aluminum V6's or small aluminum V8's. Weight is pretty important in these puppies and the more you can save, the better.
     
  11. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    we had a 4.4 litre version of that in OZ and was used in boats that wanted light weight
     
  12. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    The original Buick V6 was only a few pounds heavier than the Buick 215 aluminum V8. I don't know how the later 3800's compared.
     
  13. Sculpture767
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    Sculpture767 Junior Member

    So many suitable motors for the boat, just need to find one at the right price!
    Plans are on the way from Glen-L US. Hope they are satisfactory...
    Powerboat did you mean 4.4 buick?
    Par the hull design will only be altered if the master builder does'nt like the hull.
    As I will be working with him, I can discuss any flaws in the design then.
    Thanks for the info Guys.
     
  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    David, the original Buick (and Olds variant, which had better heads) where only produced in the USA for a short time (a couple of years?) with the rights to build being sold through successive British manufactures. Land Rover and TVR did the most for the engine, developing a new casting (slightly heavier) and with the TVR heads a potent small V8 package. The last generation of this engine could be "punched out" to about 315 CID, using the Buick 300 (iron block) crank, though most go for a more conservative 305. It's about the best engine you can use in a trike.
     

  15. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Yes no, British Leyland built the engine to 4.4 litre for an Australian car they made.
    In the UK it went out to 5.0 ltr as Par mentioned
    Some of these went into Range Rovers
     
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