Chine walking and other power issues

Discussion in 'Hydrodynamics and Aerodynamics' started by rwatson, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,852
    Likes: 290, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Since the first dawn of my 'super macgregor' project

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/bo...sailer-power-cruiser-water-ballast-21999.html

    the design has evolved into a hybrid round bilge, running strake design

    http://schoolroad.weebly.com/project-2.html

    and the attached Jpg file..

    Now that the engineering and building research is underway, my enthusiastic engineer has suggested that the design could be made easer to build if we have the 'running strakes' ( the bottom 'step' on the hull ) run all the way through to the stern. The width is around 35 mm.

    Without spending $10,000 on hull studies, I am trying to imagine the powered performance effects that this would have, in particular, on sharp turns.

    To my mind, having more 'edge' would provide better planing lift under power in a straight line, and should prevent excessive 'chine' walking, since on a turn, the inner strake should be buried in the water.

    If anyone has any opinions about this modification, or the concept as a whole, I would be interested to hear them.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 18, 2011
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