Chine Design

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Archive, Jun 12, 2001.

  1. Archive
    Joined: Jun 2001
    Posts: 169
    Likes: 0, Points: 16, Legacy Rep: 10

    Archive Senior Member

    I am currently researching the design of chines or "Lifting Rails" on a deep V hull. Hoping to get some recommendations on written material providing details. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Archive
    Joined: Jun 2001
    Posts: 169
    Likes: 0, Points: 16, Legacy Rep: 10

    Archive Senior Member

    I remember a few years back when Volvo was selling speedrails -- I'm not sure how much improvement you would see on a typical hull though, or if there were any handling "side effects". I see Ocke Mannerfelt's Batboats are doing really well now, but I no longer see speedrails for general sale...
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    So far I've gotten one well meaning reply from a directed source indicating a couple of books that "might have information" and it turnedout there really wasn't much. But at least this was a reply. COuld it be that the subject of Chines and Lifting Strakes is beyond the entire community of Designers. Or possibly a topic considered VooDoo? Or maybe them that has it is gonna keep it? Well I hope this provokes some commentary. Cause I'm still looking.
     

  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Prediction of lift/drag values, dynamic stability, etc. in the interface between hull, air, and water surface via mathematical formulae quickly becomes VERY esoteric and is best practiced by post-graduate physicists and hydrodynamicists - check out papers on the topic at The Society of Naval Architects & Marine Engineers (SNAME). The usual practice among lesser mortals is to use general formulae from texts such as Lord's "Naval Architecture of Planing Hulls" and others to get a baseline data set, then refine the design with public and proprietary hull data from previous designs or towing tank experiments. Usually the designer has a "good idea" and then builds either a full-size or scale model and performs calibrated trials to prove and improve the initial design. Mostly seat of the pants (in an expensive and formal way) engineering, I'm afraid.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.