Chesapeake bay deadrise

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Trippwise3, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. Trippwise3
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 2
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    Location: West point va.

    Trippwise3 New Member

    Hi, I am new to the forum and wondering if there are any Chesapeake Deadrise owners out there that have converted the old workboats into pleasure cruisers.
    My boat was built by Lin Price in 1954 in Deltaville Va. And was also curious if anyone has any information on Mr. price.

    Thanks for any imput.
     
  2. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    One of my friends getting his sorted this winter- still a working craft though.
    I would be cautious of adding superstructure for several reasons if the intent is sleeping quarters and the like.

    Here is my friends:

    rboat.jpg

    The structure is still as built in 1963, Crocheron, MD.
    This is getting rare as many are roughly modified in their last years before left to settle in a creek or field..
    Let me know if you need any information on the boats- I might be able to help.

    I have set up for engraving work of this type- let me know if you want a builders plaque done :):

    IMG_1935.jpg
     
  3. BMcF
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: Maryland

    BMcF Senior Member

    I guess it depends what you mean by "pleasure cruiser". There are many deadrises in my area that are restored and maintained only for day-cruising and fishing. Thompson, Deagle, Goddard built. One of the last skipjacks built to work (Goddard..1978) is based nearby and has been converted (and obtained USCG COI..) for use as a trour vessel and floating classroom. Another of Goddard's last skipjacks, being built to work, was finished out as a pleasure sailing vessel.

    Maintenance is a killer on those boats and it is getting harder and harder to find the proper timber for repairs. The old slow-growth pine they were originally built with is scarce and I've seen repairs done with new-growth wood rot out in only a few years time.
     
  4. Trippwise3
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 2
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    Location: West point va.

    Trippwise3 New Member

    Your right, the maintenance is a lot but it’s been a lot of fun learning about these old boats. We have her pretty much sound. We have one issue with a leaky horn timber but we have a cure to take care of it.
    As for the rest of it we do plan to use it as a day cruiser and for fishing. We only wanted to add some conveniences to the cabin but nothing structural.
    So far it has been a lot of fun and the old waterman really seem to be helpful due to us just trying to keep her useable.

    Thanks, Tripp
     

  5. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Larry Chowning's Chesapeake Bay Buyboats has considerable information about Linwood Price. The index references 23 pages. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0870335928/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller= His Deadrise and Cross-planked also has information about Linwood Price. The index references 7 pages. http://www.amazon.com/Deadrise-Cros...14&sr=1-1&keywords=deadrise and cross-planked


    The Deltaville Maritime Museum has a Lin Price built boat. http://www.ssentinel.com/index.php/community/article/deadrise_miss_ruth_donated_to_maritime_museum
     
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