Checking in from the high deserts of Idaho

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Dr Kung Pao, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    pahoihoi is underwater lava or pillow lava if I remember

    I specifically have some stuff for spelunking in lava tubes
    very tough environment but also rewarding because of the protected nature of the environment were "sky lights" may provide enough light to support micro-climates within the darkness
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Right. It is smooth. The rough stuff is a-a- because that is what you will utter if you sit on it.
     
  3. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    I remember now
    we had a guide take us caving in the islands years ago and it was spectacular
     
  4. Dr Kung Pao
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Location: Boise Valley

    Dr Kung Pao Junior Member

    Sounds Like I have some exploring to do myself! You're right about the equipment etc however. Its not a casual environment. I think that works to preservations advantage in these situations. Keeps the faint at heart on the road or in the picnic grounds LOL.
     
  5. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    it does but frankly although the tubes are difficult they are seldom life threatening like a deep rock cave can be
    they do however eat up equipment with all the sharp edges
    shoes particularly

    I would also strongly recommend Wapatki state park near sunset crater in Arizona as a spectacular area to explore

    if you go to the lamaki ruins parking lot and head directly away from the ruins across the desert on foot ( dont get lost ) and go in a straight line till you hit a canyon the walls of that canyon are lined with un-pilfered cliff dwellings
    do not take anything
    but you will find some amazing stuff left by the ancestors

    there are graineries and summer shelters as well as some communal dwellings up under the cliffs

    leave no trace but just build a rock cairn by where you climb down into the canyon to mark were to climb back out
    also helps to turn around leaving the parking lot and find some tall topographical mark you can key on for the return journey

    Topo map and compass might help to

    you will find lots of trash heaps bellow the dwellings with pottery in them
    also the dwellings are full of drifting volcanic ash
    but digging through it is Strictly Vorboten
    you will need a hiking permit
    its a day hike so bring supplies
    hiking in this area is limited and my native American status might have helped me get a permit
    I had to fill out a lot of forms and almost was required to hire a park guide to enter this area

    not sure how experienced you are hiking in the dessert but it does take some preparation if you want to make the best of it

    luck favors the prepared

    cheers
    B

    and thanks for the pictures
     
  6. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Mesa Verde is definitely worth a visit.
     
  7. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Acoma pueblo as well

    but once again my native status probably helped me out there some
    tourists are only allowed to take a bus and must stay together
    I was able to wander around and was invited to stay for the evening dinner ceremony
    basically someone I was talking to invited me to dinner
     
  8. Dr Kung Pao
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Location: Boise Valley

    Dr Kung Pao Junior Member

    I've never been to Arizona but have always thought that I would some day. The dry heat calls to my desert background. Those dwellings sound amazing, and like they should be protected. I'm surprised they aren't. We sure do have some pretty incredible treasures out on the left hand side of this country.

    Being invited by someone who was from there to stay and have dinner and share time would be such an honor! That must have been pretty special.
     
  9. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    there are only a few hundred full time residents of the mesa and I was very honored to have been able to stay after sun down. Traditionally no one outside the tribal people can be on the mesa after dark so yes it was a rare privilege. The village is the oldest continually inhabited place in north America and the people are very traditional, leery of outsiders and very aware of there special place in the world. I got very lucky.
     
  10. Dr Kung Pao
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Location: Boise Valley

    Dr Kung Pao Junior Member

    lucky with a little twist of karma from the universe maybe. I'm a big believer in respect being rewarded .
     

  11. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    my experience has been somewhat the opposite

    no good deed goes unpunished

    cheers
    B
     
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