Cheap steel yacht multi chine in Bulgaria

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Lollomare, Dec 6, 2015.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Some reasonably straight looking hulls among the unfinished projects pictured above, a real shame they ran out of money, enthusiasm, spousal tolerance, or some combination of those.
     
  2. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    No 5 is a really nice hull, but look at those saloon ports/window holes... how much will the windows cost alone.. then the hatches throughout? Ouch!
     
  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    To find out for yourself if it's possible you need study plans of a design first, this is to calculate the time and costs involved in building one, and to see if such a project fits your budget in both time and money, and also to see if the yacht's specifications are a good compromise for your personal needs and wishes.

    See for example the steel Van de Stadt Vita 30, her study plans are € 15.

    An other option for those calculations is the 31' Glen-L Aurora, her study plans are US $ 15.

    See also Aurora's links at the bottom here, one of them is a Bill of Materials online*, alas only in imperial units there**.

    * ‘‘ This listing is to serve as a general guide only, and is not meant to be all-inclusive. ’’

    ** Note: If interested in an (older) North American design then check if the plans are available in Metric, if not then be prepared to convert them yourself.​

    Stock plans of ocean going steel cruising yachts starts about at 24 ft, see for example the Tom Thumb 24.

    If want to pursue this, and the financial and time math for the project is posted here, then some forum members might give you a review of the calculations . . :)

    Good Luck !
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2015
  4. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    I can tell you that right now.

    Work out your best estimate of what it'll cost in money & time.

    Triple it.

    Wait 6 months.

    Double the last estimate.

    Wait 6 months.

    Buy a boat for approx the amount of your first estimate. Go sailing.

    PDW
     
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  5. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Agree.
     
  6. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Just came across this 8 m centerboarder which was successfully built by an amateur in Poland. To built the bare hull there was about € 6,000.00 the builder says in the comments below the first video. (8 m is about 26' 2 6164", so almost 26 14')

     
  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    More info about the above design can be found here on the designers website.

    OCEAN_800_ROYS_foto_3.jpg
    - - click pic to enlarge - -
     
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Guess the above Kulawik Yachts "Ocean 800 Roys" would maybe reach CE category C. See here for info about CE Categories, aka EU Recreational Craft Directive (RCD).

     
  9. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

  10. Lollomare
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    Lollomare Junior Member

  11. hoytedow
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    But it does give us something to keep us busy whilst we await the swing of the Grim Reaper's blade. :eek:
     
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  12. Alik
    Joined: Jul 2003
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    Alik Senior Member

    These are OLD definitions, right now the words 'ocean', 'offshore' are not used anymore in the Standards coz they were misleading. I saw 8m powerboats with 'offshore' cat B; they were in no way suitable for offshore use.
     
  13. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks for notifying Alik [​IMG]

    Found here the below EU document, are those in the quote the currently up-to-date definitions ?

    [​IMG] DIRECTIVE 2013/53/EU OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL, of 20 November 2013, on recreational craft and personal watercraft and repealing Directive 94/25/EC

    Quote is from page 114 / 42 of the above linked PDF:
    BTW, what does ‘‘ ⅓ ’’ mean in this context ? - ‘‘ Significant wave height (H ⅓, metres) ’’
     
  14. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    1. Take, say, 99 waves and measure their heights.
    2. Sort them from the highest to the lowest. You will get a list of this type:
      H1 , H2, H3, H4, ... , H98, H99.
      where H are the wave heights.
      H1 is the biggest wave in the list, H99 is the smallest one.​
    3. Calculate the average height of the first 33 waves in the list (1/3 of the total number of waves):
      H1/3 = 1/33 * sum(Hi)
      where i = 1 to 33​
    This average wave height is called the "significant wave height", and is denoted H1/3.

    Cheers!
     

  15. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks for explaining Daiquiri [​IMG]
     
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