Challenge: The 100$ boat!

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by DanishBagger, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Well, do you think it is possible?

    Of course, one could stick a broom shaft on a raft made from old milk bottles, and a coat for a sail, but do you think that it is possible to make a "real" boat for 100$? One that maybe won't last for long, and might just be for simple sailing on a creek?

    I am asking because I had a little talk with a member from this forum. My thoughts are "no way", but maybe, just maybe ..

    If it is to be done, I am thinking, you cannot have metal oarlocks, so you would either need to cut them out, use a paddle, or make some sails.

    Speaking of sails, maybe something made from tyvek? Polytarp? Any old tarp?

    Shape? No idea, perhaps using some old ordinary house ply, scavenged, and for stringers, also some scavenged building material?

    Or how about using cotton or the like for the hull, using "spreaders" to hold it taught against plywood frames?

    Do you think it can be done, and/or are you up for the challenge?

    Edit: Updated rules:

    Any type of propulsion
    Any length
    100$ maximum ...
    Any materials can be used
    As few special tools as possible
    The type of usage should be posted (fishing on a creek, use as a tender for a bigger boat, lake-use, diving platform or what have we.

    What isn't allowed (of course we can't check up on eachother, so this is at your discretion): You can't make use of special connections you have because of your boatbuilding. So, no scavenging yourself for super marine plywood, epoxy or the like. Neither ask your fellow boatbuilder to give you half a boat as the scavenged part. (I know this doesn't sound "legal", holed as a sieve, that it is, but I think everyone will get it).

    Also, I think we should have a time limit for the actual building. What is everybody thinking of, say, 40 hours? Too much?
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2006
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  2. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Heh, I might add that it is a shame that the dollar is as low as it, making it rather unfair for us overseas :)
     
  3. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    hansp77

    Definately Yes!

    If scavenging can be included, and time, then no matter what- i would say that it can be done. At least in a country like my own where people throw out so much good stuff. And in this regard, I am of the opinion that there are other countries that are just as bad if not worse.
    Bergalia's example of building his latest Snafu for $700 is a great example of this.
    I will copy his whole post here.

    (idiot posts… page three)
    Now this is a pretty big boat, and a boat that is built to last.
    Maybe some parameters would need to be set.
    But like I said, given time, a wastefull society, and ingenuity, I think that $100 will build you that boat.
     

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  4. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    There are several "one-sheet" boat designs out there. There are even more that use two sheets, a few 2x4's, drywall screws, and (insert name of favorite adhesive/sealant here). All less than $100 material cost, of course you can spend a lot more to improve longevity.
     
  5. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Cool, I guess I am proven wrong, then, lol :D

    Okay, so here's my idea for a boat:

    (damn, I need something to make a file I can post).

    It would be rather slim, and with two pointy ends, sort of like a whaler.

    The bottom would be flat.

    The materials could either be ply or made from boards "staggered" edgewise.

    It would be at least 260cm (8,5ft) or at the most 360 (11ft), depending on what could be scavenged. Width should be at max 90 cm at the railing, preferably narrower (for ease of rowing).

    For gunwhales, seat/"spreaders" I would use whatever is left from the hull, making two or three crossbeams.

    For rowlocks, I would cut out two pairs of half circular holes in the railing.

    the mast would simply be some thick plank, cut to rough dimensions, short, same with a gaff.

    The "gaff" should go past the mast (I believe it is called a lugrig?), and set up with string, wound many times.

    The sail could be anything, again depending on what could be scavenged, and for reinforcements I would use gaffer's tape.

    For a "keel" I would make board (no idea, what they're called) that sits on the side, fastened with strings again, but this time also with a string going under the boat and to the other side a bit further forward to make the board chatter less.

    Any other ideas?
     
  6. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Parameters

    Paramaters. Yikes!

    Okay, here are some suggestions:

    Easily propulsed, be it by oars, sculling oar, paddle or sails. This, both for ease, fun, and safety.

    Size: "small" - not exactly sure of what size, but "small" because small usually equals simple, and a small one might be carried by one guy, or two larger kids.

    Propulsion: well, whatever floats your boat ;)

    parts should be able to be scavenged asd far as possible, and without having "special" connections.

    Adhesion? Not a clue.

    Also, it should be very simple, requiring as few tools as possible.

    How are those parameters? Can we agree? Any other parameters that should be included? Some that should be excluded?

    Edit: changed "little tools" to "few tools" ....
     
  7. DanishBagger
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    DanishBagger Never Again

  8. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    hansp77

    I think one of the challenges would be that for a heavy reliance on scavenged materials, the design to a large degree will have to depend on what is available.
    I sort of think that good timber is going to be easier to scavenge than good ply. this could vary though. Maybe we need to work out where a semidecent ply can be salvaged (other than the 'five finger discount' from building sites).
    Building from timber makes the whole process a fair bit more complicated, and of course a lot heavier.

    For the budget, for adhesion I think that probably something like a liquid nails will be used, and the joins really well oil painted and protected over. Unless of course something better can be scavenged. Someone in Shakej's thread mentioned approaching boatbuilders and asking for their empty drums of epoxy, where more than enough for a project this size could be scraped out of the bottom.
    Screws could probably be salvaged, or cheap galvanised used.
    I have heard of a wrecked boat that is the same model as my boat that rotted in a paddock somewhere (and yes I do want to find it). Everything on my boat (30ft V Stadt seahorse) was built with monel nails and screws. Pretty much everything I have pulled out of mine is perfect. A few hours digging at the grave of one of these old ladies would provide more than enough screws and nails.
    Rigging, get some of the old stainless cable that has been replaced on a bigger yacht, and ropes, well maybe the same, or find some rockclimbers who will give/sell you their old ropes.

    A lot of stainless can be salvaged out of dumped stuff. Kitchen sinks and fridges contain alot that can be cut out, reworked and welded into usable stuff.

    then sails I guess. Bergalias old canvas tent solution may be good, other wise put the word out at sailmakers and boat clubs to try to get old and or damaged sails.

    Sounds like fun.
     
  9. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    hansp77


    You know I would like one of them too.
    And I do need it,
    to get out to my swing mooring.

    at 25-30 pounds, the plans aren't even that expensive.
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    As defending champion of the Junk Boat Competition of Lake Petenwell, Wisconsin, I have to say yes. The rules allow $25.00 to be spent and any kind of junk or garbage that is laying around can be added.
     
  11. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

  12. Wellydeckhand

    Wellydeckhand Previous Member

    Err..... US$100 get u a new wooden river boat made out of bengkirai of Loa 2.5m in Indonesia. Why build if you can buy?

    If this is a competition, then it would be US$100 to build the biggest, the most beautiful and design wise foxy boat afforable by the set limit.

    With money as Gonzo say a portion only for junk yard stuff, free junk stuff not more than half of the boat.

    Yep, I can see this competition would be slow and torturous as we go around begging:)

    Nontheless who will set the rule? I gonna try.......... and surprise you all with a small metal boat for US$100?

    WDH
     
  13. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Hehe, welly. That would almost be cheating :D

    But, yeah, someone should begin and set the standard, and welly, if you do that, remember that you cannot make use of your "special" connections.

    The reason for this is that I was asked about this by a non-boatbuilder, and to be fairest for most, I think that is the way to go.

    Can we all agree to adding this to the rules:

    "The most beatiful" - although that is subjective, at least we won't have too many rafts?

    I don't think that the "Half"-rule can work, what is "half of a boat", considering some of it has been scavenged?



    Gonzo - are you suggesting we should lower the amount, to say 50$?

    I'm not capable of agreeing to 25, as that can't buy me more than one or two rolls of gaffer's tape around here
     
  14. Wellydeckhand

    Wellydeckhand Previous Member

    I think in western country you have better scapeyard and stuff left in people home able to be taken with permission as long as we look kind.

    I am not turning you guys into bag lady and run around begging:) but a good view of town get you things you never noticed was thrown or discarded.

    I mean you can start looking into houses that throw stuff after redecore or upgrade renovation............ plenty of stuff............ begging is the last straw babe.

    WDH

    P.S. some company give welding rods and grinding disc sample for free..... get the drift?:D
     

  15. hansp77
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    hansp77

    I need to get a tender.
    And, after the ordeal of purchasing my boat, restoring her, buying a mooring, surveying, and insuring, I have no money. Actually I have minus money. I spent all my money just on buying the boat!
    So maybe I shall enter into this little game.

    My boat will be powered by rowing, and will be winched up uder the jetty where my swing mooring is. Thus I have to design it, or finish it at least, so that it does not look too pretty otherwise someone will nick it. (or at least that will be my excuse ;) I am thinking here maybe some carefully painted staining to resemble rot? I don't know, it is going to be difficult to not want to make it look as good as possible.

    I wonder if the rules will allow me to use my own stored offcuts and leftovers from our current restoration?
    Probably not.



    So for me, the hunting and gathering shall begin.
    As my mid year holidays are about to begin, I shall call around the local councils and set a schedule of when and where "hard rubbish" pickups are hapening.
    Ah, hard rubbish, the australian scavengers dream.
    (Last year we found a brand new girls Giant mountainbike out with a pile of other bikes- the same model was still for sale in bike shops for $700, all that was wrong with it was that someone had unscrewed the little brake adjuster and tried to screw it back in off its thread)
    I have one big 74 transit van that I can fit just about anything in- and even better, our house we rent has a massive empty pool in a shed where I can store all of my salvaged goods, as well as more than enough room to build the boat.

    Can we use plans for this or do we have to make the plans oursleves?
    I have the original plans for my boat which include plans for a tender.
    Maybe at least I will start from here.
    But this plan is for one made out of ply, and I am thinking of trying to use timber instead...

    Can anyone point me to some free plans for a tender built out of timber?

    This is going to be fun.
    (and maybe just a little dangerous)

    Ladies and gentlemen,
    let the games begin.
     
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