chainplates, doeas this work?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Brorsan, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. Brorsan
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Gothenburg/Sweden

    Brorsan Junior Member

    Yesterday i was looking on a boat that is for sale, good plastic but else like a wreck. The owner off the boat have made some new chainplates that he have laminated on to the boat.

    The thing is, i have never seen chainplates like this, and i simply wonder if this is a method that "can be used" and do you think it wll hold the loads?

    He have reinforced the hull with aprox 1cm glassfibre and guess epoxi, and then before it dried he bolted the chainplate through the hull with 4 bolts, so the chainplate is recessed aprox 2mm into the reinforcement.

    Is this really a valid construction method for chainplattes?
    A bad photo, but maybe it will help you understand the construction.


    I have not bought the boat yet, so i'm thankful for fast replies.
    Regards Brorsan
     

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  2. Herman
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: The Netherlands

    Herman Senior Member

    questions:

    -was there a chainplate in that area before?
    -will the surrounding polyester be enough to withstand the load?
    -have the bolts been embedded sufficiently

    Although I do not feel there went a lot of thought into this "project", I guess it might hold just fine, at least if the shear forces will not break the bolts.

    I guess he used polyester, as he used CSM mat.
     
  3. Brorsan
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Gothenburg/Sweden

    Brorsan Junior Member

    I hope the old chainplates where located at the same place, but i dont know, There was no "old" chainplate hole in the deck, so i think they must be on the same place as the old one.

    If i gets out of my mind (might happend) and actualy buy this piece of junk, maybe i could lay one layer of glassfibre (the weaved sort) and epoxi on the inside of the chainplate, so it use both sides of the plate to get the load to the hull, and maybe make the area of the covering glass and epoxi bigger then the poliester reinforcement he has done. What do you think?

    Thank you for your help.
     
  4. Roly
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: NZ

    Roly Senior Member

    How is the load on the bolt heads supported on the outside of the hull?

    I have seen a similar method used without the bolts, but a horizontal, welded to the bottom of the chain plate and embedded in the hull layup, wet on wet I assume. These boats have lasted 30+ years & raced hard with no failures that I know of.
     
  5. Bglad
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Jacksonville, Florida

    Bglad Senior Member

    Before covering the plate with fiberglass consider that leaving it exposed allows you to inspect and prove its condition from time to time. Chain plates embedded in pockets of glass that can accumulate moisture may suffer from crevice corrosion. Without a means to inspect them your only clue may be when they pull out:(
     
  6. Roly
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: NZ

    Roly Senior Member

    I agree. Rather build up behind the plate.with epoxy & glass. (uni- both ways or
    Db) Still curious to the outside?
     

  7. Brorsan
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Gothenburg/Sweden

    Brorsan Junior Member

    thank you for your thoughts and advises. The bolts on the outside of the hull are with a radius of about 1cm.
    Think i will pass on the boat after all, it is simply too baadly maintained for te price asked for it. Thank you again
    /Brorsan
     
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