Catamaran sank

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by El_Guero, Oct 10, 2013.

  1. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Friends,

    A powered catamaran went out on a fishing trip. And she went down - fast.

    http://2coolfishing.com/ttmbforum/showthread.php?p=5933353#post5933353

    No crazy stuff in response, we do not need lawyers getting involved in our thread.

    Kudos to the captain for keeping a cool and collected head about him, and getting everyone into life preservers (PFD's). And thank God everyone is OK.

    My question would be, what would you do to prevent your vessel from sinking, or to slow sinking?

    Especially, on the slowing down of your boat sinking - what would you add or change in your design?

    Wayne

    PS at the beginning of the thread, there is a before picture and during the sinking pictures.

    http://2coolfishing.com/ttmbforum/showthread.php?t=610218
     
  2. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    It is funny after the fact.

    Guess what they saved as the boat went down? Now, remember they are Texans.

    Did you guess?
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    In my very humble opinion, life jackets just aren't good enough, you need a self-inflating life raft, or failing that, foam flotation that guarantees a stable, upright boat.
     
  4. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    I thought of that, especially looking at the photos .... they looked like cold, wet, cats .... kitty cats, not catamarans.

    I think I am very much with you. I rethought my 'wants' and 'needs' in regard to built in flotation.
     
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    If they are like Floridians they saved the cooler full of beer.
     
  6. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    The artillery? ;)
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Bilge level alarms proper watchkeeping and enough waterproof compartments bulkheads to keep a hull leak from sinking you.
     
  8. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Nope. I think they let that go down with the ship. But, close.


    WE HAVE A WINNER!

    Did you see the pictures, or just guess good?

    PS, the cooler floats, so we should design an emergency flotation cooler, life boat ....
     
  9. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    I keep wondering how they did not have enough waterproof compartments?

    It was a catamaran! And went down in 20 minutes.

    Reading up on foam, even closed cell should be wrapped, so water doesn't water log it ....
     
  10. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

  11. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Thank you! Great read.

    Now you got me thinking.
     
  12. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    Ditto....

    I notice that some poor wretch had the nerve to suggest bilge alarms on the other forum and was roundly lambasted for his troubles. No doubts the 'captain' acted sensibly, but you can't help but wonder if it was all necessary.
     
  13. Nate57
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Belize

    Nate57 Junior Member

    He never mentions if his pumps were functioning. Sinking in 20 minutes would suggest that slightly larger pumps would have kept up. Too many small boat owners think a small battery powered pump in the bilge is all they'll ever need.
     
  14. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: united states

    FMS Senior Member

    For inboard boats a fast flow emergency pump can add substantial pump capacity. These pumps install on the main engine shaft.
    From http://fastflowpump.com/bilge-pump-design.html
    "With a shaft turning approximately 600 -2000 RPM with a five foot vertical head the Fast Flow 3 inch model can pump roughly 50,000 gallons per hour or 900 gallons per minute". It has a spaced, non-contact impeller design for minimal hp loss and operation would be automatic in an emergency..
     

  15. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    without partitions in the bilge, the free water in the bilge will slosh forward ,aft , port , stardboard defeating the bilge pump . A sea going boat must follow the accepted practice of waterproof compartments , bilge partitions, bilge alarms and correctly sized bilge pumps.

    One advantage of homebuilding is that the builder can use best practice when building .

    Production boats always take the cheap way out.
     
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