Catamaran from two single hull boats

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by nimblemotors, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Catamaran from two single hull boats.

    Thats what the Prout Bros did eons ago. :rolleyes:
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You'd have to think Polynesian catamarans would have been canoes that someone decided to join together, and saw advantages in it.
     
  3. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I one time came across a IOR 1/4toner in a field.
    Having the same idea but for a trimaran, I looked at it pretty closely - it would have been free.

    If you were to cut away the bottom of the boat and put a narrow hull under the upper structure, you could add horizontal "decks" about 1 ft above the waterline and you would have the concept of a Farrier. Narrow hull in the water, flared strongly up to the sides, with a much wider deck/ cockpit.
    Now all you need to do is build structure inside the hull for the fore and aft crossarms.

    Not as simple as might be desired, but a true catamaran or trimaran hull shape while retaining the majority of the structure.
    There was a guy who did something similar to a J24 - I never heard the end of the story.
     
  4. tommymonza
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    tommymonza Junior Member

    Isla Mujeres Mexico on a regular daily basis has many of these abortions ferrying people from the mainland. First time I ever scene something like it bit it is nothing but a means to move people . Against any current or headwind the contraptions couldn't beat an Island in a race .
     
  5. rapscallion
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    rapscallion Senior Member

    There was one trimaran, made from a monohull that looked interesting. I think he started with a soling. It's the best monohull - multihull conversion I have seen. If I really wanted a larger catamaran on the cheap, I would build a wharram. That way, you would at least have something at the end of your efforts that had market value. A frankenstien multihull made from cutting a monohull in half won't be worth the man hours you put into it. Anything can be done, what you should be asking yourself is how do I get the maximum return for my effort, and in my opinion, that is a wharram. Cookingfat, a wharram 22, was built for under 5K. It raced across the Atlantic in a race called the Jester challenge and took second place. That's a good boat for the price. Other multis that could be built for that money would be a seaclipper 24 trimaran, which could likely use a beachcat rig, which could be found for cheap. Sailing can be done well on a shoestring budget if you are clever.
     
  6. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    The Soling Tri uses Tornado catamaran hulls for amas.
    One article on the boat: http://smalltrimarans.com/blog/?p=2144

    PS: I recently saw a soling for sale for $750 and a Tornado (one hull needs repair in the side) for $1000.

    Also a collection of Tornado parts for $400.
     
  7. rapscallion
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    rapscallion Senior Member

    That's it! I suspect the builder didn't lose money when he sold it, which would be consideration for me.
     
  8. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Two Questions.
    1. Was the ballast removed from the keel.
    2. Did the alloy crossarms have water stays.
     
  9. Manfred.pech
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    Manfred.pech Senior Member

  10. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Thank you Manfred.
    I can see from your Dwgs that the answer to both questions is YES.
    I am impressed. :D
     

  11. aussiebushman
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    aussiebushman Innovator

    You need to read the posts in the thread: Catamaran plans/design question Especially note the true story I told there about the 35' Piver

    Alan
     
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