Carolina flare hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by JINLEE, Oct 7, 2014.

  1. JINLEE
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    JINLEE Junior Member

    I am looking for stock designs of carolina flare boat with coach house.
    LOA 32ft abt. with twin stern legs.

    The hull and deck structures to be alloy (aluminum #5083 or 6061 grade)

    Does anyone know where I can purchase the plans or right navals who can design?
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It is not a design that can be economically built with aluminum. The surfaces are not developable.
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Well the shapes can be developed, but it does offer some compromises. Aluminum construction doesn't have to be fully developed and clever design can make this alloy, mimic the 'glass versions quite well.

    As to the NA's and designer that offer plans, well this is a pretty simple thing, just start hitting sites and see what you find. An aluminum 32' Carolina skiff design will not be very common, so a custom or semi-custom design may be necessary, possibly a conversion from another material is possible.
     
  4. JINLEE
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    JINLEE Junior Member

    Hi Gonzo, cold mold would make it easier but is my client's requirements. we have good faiers once we get shapes. please comment.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    To properly build a Carolina style boat in aluminum, you will have to shape each plate. I have build several in cold molded and balsa core. If your client has enough money it can be done, even if it doesn't make sense to. There are CNC plate forming machines that can do that. Relying on a lot of fairing is not good.
     
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  6. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    Gonz is right. The difficulty depends mostly on how much of the "Carolina flare" you want. Some are so extreme you could hide under there out of the rain. View from the helm is almost rectangular. Current boats are getting less extreme flare.

    All of the local Carolina sport fishermen are built in either cold molded plywood or strip, but mostly molded ply and I've never known an aluminum one. Some are fiberglass but most clients want their own ideas in there and that rules out fiberglass. Many clients now want a custom cruiser that looks like a Carolina flare fisherman and I'll not be surprised to see some 100' LOA soon. Wandered through a 70' one recently with 2 wine cellars one for the guests and one for VIPs.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    This is what they look like
     

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  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've seen this hull form done in alloy, though most of the time a chine is used just below the flare, below which is a conventionally shaped hull, above are the rolled plates for the flare.
     
  9. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    I'm guessing what you refer to as a chine below the flare is the extension of the aft sheer line as a crease in the topsides. It eventually disappears into the smooth forward topsides shape. It is mainly for personal preference of the client although it may make forming of the sides easier. There is a sharp break in the sheer as the forward sheer rolls into the aft sheer at a sharp deck join and is part of that style. I prefer the sweeping sheer without the crease but that's just personal.
     
  10. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, you've got it Tom, I too prefer the seamless flare, but it does make the proposition much easier on the builder. It's still possible to roll the forward plates, but you'll want a seriously skill set of fabricators.
     
  11. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I doubt that bow forms of Caroline can be achieved with a metal hull, unless you arrange tools for bending plates and skilled personnel. However, you could get something "similar", made ​​to measure. If you don´t find information and do not know where to go, if that's okay, we can talk and see where we are, both, capable of reaching.
     
  12. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'm glad no-one called it "flair" ! But it would take a lot of talent to make it in alloy.
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The flared portion of the bow can be done in diagonal strips, say 12" to 18" wide, rolled to suit, though admittedly, you'd need skilled alloy work.
     
  14. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Similar to the way the boats are commonly built by cold molding strips of plywood.
     

  15. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Certainly with diagonal strips may provide any shapes to the surface of the hull. I guess those strips will welded with each other and have to use a disc to remove traces of welding in order to achieve adequate surface appearance. Moreover, the welding, continuous of course, of such as narrow strips would result deform them a lot.
    This process, in my opinion, is so expensive that it would be preferable to bend the plates by either procedure. As the thickness can not be very high, about 3 mm, likely to be found inexpensive tools to make it.
    I see no practical method. For some reason, each material has its own way of working.
     
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