Carolina flare build and materials

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by lenm, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. Mikeemc
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    Location: South Carolina

    Mikeemc Junior Member

    I knee this is not a Carolina skiff , but way back when we built fish flatty's , this is pretty much how we did it. You can add more flair using thinner material. Very easy build.
     
  2. Mikeemc
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    Location: South Carolina

    Mikeemc Junior Member

  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I like Ashcroft, simply because you can lay both layers at the same time. The seams do remain mostly parallel, but there's some variance, making things fit. On molded builds, I usually find the worst part of the hull and bend around the stock to see what angle works and this becomes the "angle". In reality, this angle changes with spiling and hull shape, typically in the ends as I'm sure you know.
     
  4. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

    One approach tomolding

    Here is a 50 footer being laminated about 20 years ago. It was built by the same builder who is now the head builder of the 90 footer of this thread. Some laminates are fairly parallel and some have considerable cross angle.
     

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  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, it depends on the twist the hull puts in the panels as they go up and how fast you want to plank.
     
  6. lenm
    Joined: Dec 2014
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    lenm Junior Member

    Thanks guys, and well, sorry for the vague questions on my behalf , but you've well and truly covered what I was hoping for.
    A great video there and photos.
    Damn you Yankees design/build some sexy boats.
    I'm loving these C flares.
    My Ocracoke 20 plans are currently in the post from Graham/Carla. Can't wait to get started.
     
  7. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Good choice of designer. Any updates?
     
  8. lenm
    Joined: Dec 2014
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    Location: australia

    lenm Junior Member

    Milehog, the boat is progressing slower than hoped - Mostly due to fact that I ended up having to build a place to build the boat first. Anyway the concrete slab is down and roofing going up. I am using large span (4.2m) pallet racking as the structure to shelter the boat. Quite economical $ and hopefully duel purpose (given it has a high load rating should come in handy when it comes time to hoist or flip the boat.
    I am currently building the keel out of hoop pine being our local substitute for douglas fir.

    Regarding the glass over ply sandwich, I had thoughts about whether cross linking the inner and outer skins is advantageous? I.e. holes bored every 150mm and filled with a solid material (epoxy glass nylon), then glass inner and outer skins.
    I recall building a sandwich windsurfer like this long ago and it held up much better than standard construction. Boatwise, My reasoning is that it could minimise the chance of the ply layers separating/delaminating?
    Not sure if the gains are offset by the fact that drilling panels you may be weakening them and setting up a course for fracture line (shear)??
    Interested to hear anyone's thoughts on this topic.
     
  9. lenm
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    lenm Junior Member

    I guess that the skin over a ply is more about 'waterproofing' rather than strength (given its inherent structural strength), so my reasoning with respect to ply is possibly completely wrong)?
     
  10. PAR
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Lenm is correct, a plywood core typically doesn't need any additional strength or stiffness in small craft, so the sheathing schedule is abrasion resistance and waterproofing. Wrapping around the end grain will prove difficult with any plywood less than 1/2" thick. You'll need to round over the edges to get it to lay down and this complicates the process.

    In terms of Graham's design, the structure is more than suitable, without the sheathing, though without it, damage and moisture gain will be more problematic.
     

  11. lenm
    Joined: Dec 2014
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    lenm Junior Member

    Thanks PAR as always for your input / expert advise.
    This thread was initiated in order to help decide upon the 'ultimate' material for project, however, after talking with many enthusiasts, I am starting to think about it in a more practical context I.e. cost/labour vs return.
    For example, my current boat was launched in 2005, and hence seen a decade of predominately blue water use. I estimate another 5-10 years life still left in it given its current condition . If it were to sink tomorrow I would be satisfied I have already extracted a decent lifespan / return from it. The point I'm trying to make is that over engineering or making something unnecessarily expensive (e.g.utilising exotic aramid sheathing like kevlar) is perhaps pointless, rather, build for fitness for purpose. I'm not looking for a 25 year lifespan on this build (I'll be an old man), nor would my son probably want to inherit it :)
    Who knows, with the cost of fuel and environmental issues we may all be cruising around in efficient catamarans and hybrid electric motors by then?
    I'm sourcing some mid range/ priced materials and just concentrate on building it well, with maximum attention to detail (waterproofing).
     
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