Carolina all fibreglass hulls

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Quinnhp, Jul 22, 2018.

  1. Quinnhp
    Joined: Mar 2017
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    Location: Victoria British Columbia

    Quinnhp Junior Member

    i would like to stop fixing and restoring boats and build new boats for sale (small production).

    I love Carolina flare hulls and they don’t really exist in the Pacific Northwest.
    Up here cold mold built boats are definitely not popular.

    Why don’t I see builders of carolina flare hulls in all fibreglass and composite materials on less than 35 foot size?

    Is there a manufacturing challenge to pull a hull like that from a mold? Even though that mold would be two piece because of tumble home?

    I am considering building a Cnc cut cold mold hull as a plug and pulling a mold from this (with permission)

    Can anyone tell me if this can’t be done or what major concerns, challenges or difficulties I might face with building a mold of this design?

    Thanks

    And if anyone knows of a 23-28 foot Carolina flare mold for sale, please connect me. This isn’t a dream, it’s the next step that happens now
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A Google image search of "Carolina flare hulls" brings up quite a few that are under 35'.
     
  3. Quinnhp
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    Quinnhp Junior Member

    Thanks mr efficiency.

    I’m able to find tons of Carolina flare hulls under 35 feet.
    What I can’t find are fibreglass molds of Carolina flare hulls . Just about all Carolina flare hulls I find are cold molded. I’m looking for all fibreglass hulls and specifically looking for fibreglass molds.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Do they typically have tumblehome ? Bit of an inconvenience, that, if they do.
     
  5. Quinnhp
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    Quinnhp Junior Member

    Just about all Carolina flared hulls I come across have tumble home and I wish more manufacturers of large numbers would include it in their designs but they don’t because it takes more time to prep a two piece hull mold.

    By saving a few man hours, we’ve lost an important part of hull design. Shame
     
  6. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    If you feel strongly about it you can always have the tooling built yourself, most builders have a hard enough time making a profit on hulls that are in style and have a demand for them, they don't like to take risks like that.
     
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  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It wouldn't be a Carolina Sportfisherman otherwise. They have pronounced tumblehome, a huge amount of flare at the bow and a broken reverse sheer.
     
  8. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Sometimes there are products (like a boat with a Carolina flare hull) with a shape (like tumble home) that would prohibit pulling from a one piece mold vertically, but can be de-molded by lifting one end while pulling the product forward, similar to pulling a foot out of a shoe. There are of course limitations but it is done.
    You are not the first to wonder about
    Why no mass produced Custom Carolina 23ft range??
    Why no mass produced Custom Carolina 23ft range?? - The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum https://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-forum/328735-why-no-mass-produced-custom-carolina-23ft-range.html


    This looks to be a one piece mold...
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It might be, that that is not really tumbleholme, but just going from some "flam" at the chine, to near vertical at the sheer, aft. The snag with smaller Carolina skiffs, could be they have little deadrise aft, which lends itself to a harsh ride, whereas in 35+ feet lengths, the boat isn't coming out of the water so much, exposing those flattish mid and aft sections.
     
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  10. Quinnhp
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    Quinnhp Junior Member

    Funny how a single image can inspire someone so powerfully.

    Thank you Sam Sam for the pic of the one piece mold of that beautiful custom Carolina hull. You have no idea what you’ve just done. I’m sitting here with my morning coffee looking at it, staring at it, drooling at it and now I know that I have to build a cold mold hull for the single purpose of turning it into a plug and then a mold.

    I knew it could be done but I also knew it would be a ton of work and take much longer than I hoped to get in this game.....but I’m going to do it. This picture now goes up on my shop wall until I have my goal.

    Now I’m going to ask all of you for feedback on which custom Carolina hull made via Cnc jigs is in your opinion the best.
    I’m looking for no more than 28 feet, and the boat won’t see shallow waters here in the pacific so full deep vee is welcome.

    Right now my personal favourite is a 26 by envi boats....but I’m open to all designs and designers. If I don’t stay open in my preferences, I’ll fall flat on my face so please tell me why this I a good choice or tell me why this is a bad choice or what’s out there that’s better.

    Cheers
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Why are you limited to CNC jigs?
     
  12. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

  13. Quinnhp
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    Quinnhp Junior Member

    Not limited to Cnc jigs, I just prefer them because of their accuracy and the fact that if I would like a tweak to a design (more dead rise at transom) then the designer can make that change instantly. That’s something that appeals to me with environmental boats. I spoke with Marc a couple years ago and we discussed how easy it was to change on the fly.

    But my top priority is the best performing hull so if someone knows of a designer who’s hull is that much better than others but the design is only limited to plans, well, I’m not closed to that idea.

    Keep in mind I’m a first time builder. I restore boats, have successfully extended hulls from port to starboard as bracket extensions, have made my own single pull plugs and molds but these were parts that would be faired and painted. I’ve never produced fully finished production molds so the idea of accuracy provided for me by way of cnc cut jigs is appealing.

    I have a small cnc router and am semi-proficient with it. I plan on investing in a large 5x10 cnc router to produce foam plugs for the decks, top cap, and express style wheelhouse.

    Why don’t I just cut my own jigs then?

    Because I’m not a naval architect and it’s much easier to pay for a set of pre-cut jigs and pay the per hull licensing fees. Designing and cutting the super structures I can handle, that’s my comfort zone right now.

    (Again, I don’t pretend to know the perfect path to all of this so fee free to shout out “you idiot, don’t do it that way”)

    Sam Sam - do you know who has that one piece mold? Maybe a phone call to that person would be a good idea.
     
  14. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Hand lofting is as accurate as CNC. The design can also be easily tweaked on the lofting table. However, there are some convenient features of a DXF file for CNC. The main being the possibility of emailing the file.
     

  15. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Why a DXF file for cnc ?. I do not see the reason. The programming language of the cutting machines has nothing to do with the dxf files. You can send by email a lot of types of files even if they are not dxf.
     
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