Cargo Canoe conversion ?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Steveca4, Apr 3, 2020.

  1. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 42
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    I know I am asking way too much from a single watercraft but so be it, one can dream. I've bought a 16' aluminum, square stern, cargo canoe. Hoping to convert it into a row, sail, small outboard adventure camper and fishing vessel.

    There are many ways to go about this, from taking along shore camping gear to making it into a sailing canoe cruiser. But I am hoping to keep it as simple to do as possible: more time on the water, less in the shop.

    I'm open to hearing both the negatives comments and inspiring comments: all suggestions and welcomed.

    Note:
    1) I have the ability to use a small motorcycle trailer I've put a long tongue onto. I had used it for a 20' flat bottom canoe I built and since sold.
    2) I will be mostly freshwater exploring in Northwestern Ontario and Southeastern Manitoba but maybe some day do the Lake Huron North Channel and the Mississipi Circle route. If I live long enough.

    Hope to hear some great ideas, thanks everyone.
    regards Steve (63yrs).
     
  2. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    16’ of open canoe does not sound like a real fun adventuring vehicle! Hopefully you are a minimalist.
    Carrying capacity will be pressed with motor and fuel, sails and spars, oars and apparatus to mount them, not to mention necessities for human comfort like food and shelter.
    Not saying it can’t be done, numerous stories are written about it, but mostly by young people who are able to ignore creature comforts in favor of adventure.
    Good luck!
     
    bajansailor likes this.
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    You can definitely do it. Making some items to serve multiple uses will help to prevent overloading it. For example, a pup tent can double as a square sail and the tent poles as a mast. If you need to go upwind, use the paddle or motor.
     
    clmanges likes this.
  4. clmanges
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Location: Ohio

    clmanges Senior Member

    Unless you think you'll need it for doing long upwind stretches, I'd leave the motor behind. That boat would probably glide pretty nicely loaded. I'd suggest using a kayak paddle, too; I could never see the sense in single-blade paddles myself. I like Gonzo's idea, too.

    Before you take any major trips, I'd suggest loading it up as you intend and just going out for a couple hours a time or two; a couple shake-down cruises, and try it in the roughest weather and wave conditions you'd expect to meet. Then you'll be ready, as opposed to being unpleasantly surprised.

    If you decide to get a motor, the smallest one you can find will likely be more than adequate.
     
  5. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    We made several 75 mile trips around a chain of lakes in northern British Columbia and built a removable mast at the front of the canoe, just basically a 1 1/2 prox conduit. then a triangular sail, ie triangular up top the wings coming
    down with ropes to where my wife would sit. We never tied the ropes off so if a gust came up it was just a matter of letting the ropes go, instantly. We really only got a benefit from this rigging when we had the following wind as the canoe would not be steerable with a round bilge and no keel/lee board. So if sailing is a must, then you could consider an outrigger to aid in steering and stability.
    The canoe was an 18'6' Sea Clipper. The idea with just holding the ropes was that due to the round bilge and not really a low ballast, the boat was EXTREMELY tippy.
    As several trips were in Grizzly and black bear country, we built a wannagan, out of aluminum, with a locking bear proof latch system, with tying loops that we could put a rope on and haul into a tree. For food stuff
    Additionally, several of the large waterproof duffle bags, top sided that when you rolled the top down and clipped it, they would float and never let water in. Strapped in, they would aid in floating if you rolled over
    Consider getting some spray skirts or canoe covers to keep the rain off your gear\
    Bent paddles are an advantage
    Myself, unless restricted on the waterway, a small motor seems like the better route
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2020
  6. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    -------------------------
    Thanks for this. I hear you, several times I've thought about this idea to have a motor, row, sail watercraft but the sailing part always over complicates thing. And I can run most of a day on a tank of gas for my 2.5 Suzuki 4 stroke. Perhaps I should focus on getting some time in with just oars, paddles and a motor, see how that works out. My 16' cargo canoe will paddle Ok, but its not a touring canoe, has a bit of a keel. Definitely look into the cover idea and the waterproof bags. You know I gotta ask eh: what is a wannagan, a food box? Steve
     
  7. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    ------------------------------------
    The motor is more because I find myself out on lakes I probably shouldn't be on and would have a tough time getting back without it. The three some creates the challenges, motor, row and sail. It would likely be easier to either go motor/row and paddle or row, sail and paddle. Sailing with traditional sails also takes a fair bit of time to set up. But in my case I would be looking for the simplest of sails, lanteen or lug?
     
  8. clmanges
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Location: Ohio

    clmanges Senior Member

    I still don't know the names of them, but i9f you want simple, copy this:



    And don't forget, you'll need a leeboard.
     
  9. clmanges
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Location: Ohio

    clmanges Senior Member

  10. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    ---------------------------
    Thats pretty cool thank you
    Steve
     
  11. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    You need:
    1. Optimist sail and spars
    2. Crossbeam (attach under gunwhale with clamps) with leeboards
    3. Kick up rudder
    4. Engine mount. Either another crossbeam at the back or you unship the rudder.
     
  12. kapnD
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: hawaii, usa

    kapnD Senior Member

    With a good breeze at the stern, stripping your shirt and holding your arms over your head will move you right along.
    It’s an especially interesting technique when you’ve a female crew to double sail power.
     
  13. Tiny Turnip
    Joined: Mar 2008
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    Location: Huddersfield, UK

    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Have a look at Solway Dory. Their business is sailing canoes, and rigs, leeboards, outriggers and redress to convert canoes to sailing.
     

  14. Steveca4
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 42
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    Location: Ste Anne, Manitoba, Canada

    Steveca4 Junior Member

    -------------------
    I did, won't likely be ordering from them due to shipping distance and prices, but a wealth of canoe sailing information I can learn from, thanks for the tip.
     
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