Canting Cruisers

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Moggy, Dec 27, 2014.

  1. Moggy
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    Moggy Senior Member

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  2. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Probably not that many.

    This boat is clearly intended for high performance, despite its relatively shallow draft.

    Most cruisers want headroom, reasonable comfort, and decent payload capacity.

    High performance design, unless in very large sizes, simply doesn't fill those requirements.

    I'm not knocking this boat. I'm just stating the usual SOR of a cruising sailboat.

    Somewhere out there may be an odd duck who wants something fast enough to embarrass most racers, on a boat to boat bases.
     
  3. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

  4. Moggy
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    Moggy Senior Member

    Did you look at the page and photos? She is quite a fat old cruiser by racing standards... plenty of comfort there!
     
  5. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Yeah, I have.

    She is somewhat Beamy, but she has the shallow, skimming-dish hull, which promises really fast speeds, at least off wind.

    Upwind, she may very well be like driving on a dirt road with a truck with no springs.

    This is not your usual cruiser's cup of tea, but there are always exceptions.

    She looks fast, but probably sails faster than she looks.
     
  6. Moggy
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    Moggy Senior Member

    Hmmmmm, a conservative yacht by my reckoning. Sounds like you are thinking of fat lead mines as the norm... she looks like a decent passage maker but no more... to me.
     
  7. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Judging by her actual size, 65 ft, I have to agree (I went to the actual web site to find that out).

    But who ever owns her better have a good wad of cash, as her systems will probably cost some money to maintain.

    The reason most cruisers use "lead Mines" is that they get the most displacement and carrying capacity for the buck (also lower slip and mooring fees as well, as the "lead mines" tend to be shorter, for the same displacement).

    Ones with longer keels can also "dry out" and have bottom work, such as cleaning, painting, and minor repairs, done without a haul out.

    That and comfort and safety are primary concerns.

    Higher performance often ends up at the bottom of the list.

    'Led mines' also tend to be durable and often somewhat over built, so, with reasonable care, they can last generations.

    Lighter, high performance boats, tend to have greater stress concentration, combined with lighter, often exotic construction, which often fails to meet the test of time.
     
  8. Moggy
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    Moggy Senior Member

    You are really being very overly general there.
     

  9. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    Maybe I am.

    Was just pointing out the advantages of more traditional cruising sailboat types.

    As I'm sure you noticed, economy is an underlying theme in the virtues mentioned.

    Not everybody who goes cruising has to count every penny.

    There are affluent and even wealthy cruisers, who would have no problem paying for a haul out every time bottom work is needed, or paying more for slip and mooring fees.

    I always say: the right boat for the right owner.

    The oceans are big enough for everyone.
     
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