cannal boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by paul t devine, May 22, 2012.

  1. paul t devine
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: knoxville tn

    paul t devine New Member

    can a cannal boat be built with ferro cement? (with proper framing of coarse)
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Sure, there are plenty of work barges built of ferrocement. In fresh water the corrosion problem of the metal mesh is minimal too.
     
  3. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    Problem with FC is the same as always, quite heavy for the strength, difficult to fasten to, labor intensive, impossible to get insurance. It's very strong and long lasting if done right, but wood or steel is usually more practical. You say a 'cannal' boat. I assume you mean a boat for canals, with shallow draft and not too wide. Is this a houseboat, cruiser, load packer or what? Power, sail, outboards?
     
  4. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Here in China there are hundreds upon hundreds of ferroboats . Here there are thousands of miles of cannals . Every time i fly into the Shenzhen air port i see over a thousand that were loaded with shingle and mud and are the main foundations to the rivers stop banks all parked and partly sunk in the shallows and then filled in around .
    At the back of the factory where i work theres 3 smallish river boats ! all ferro they never have any water in them ever so must be hell of a water proof !
    Along the side of the fast train track to Kunshan theres a whole village of house boats and a good percentage of them are ferro and others are steel and some wood hulls :D
     
  5. paul t devine
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: knoxville tn

    paul t devine New Member

    first i would like to thank everyone for they're input. very helpful. my next question, before i start to design my cannal boat( which will be a home) i noticed the cannal locks around knoxville are quite wide and long for the coal and salt barges. are they the same size through out the riverways of USA?
     
  6. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The USA has few places where width is a problem. In the bigger locks 3 barges wide and 5 long is a normal push.

    In working the design I would suggest 15 lbs per sq ft of hull.

    Sure the ferro guys will claim 9lbs , But I have never seen one that light actually built.

    FF.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Paul, how much structure design expertise do you have and do you fully understand the function and physical properties of the elements involved in a ferro build? Of course this assumes you also have a clue about the hydrodynamics involved in yacht design.
     
  8. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

  9. paul t devine
    Joined: May 2012
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    Location: knoxville tn

    paul t devine New Member

    hi guys, once again my thanks to everyone!! just to let you guys know, i'd scratched the ferro cement, because the size and length of the boat. anything over 40 ft would have problems. the size i want to do is 16 ft beam-80ft loa.
     
  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    In today's market , USED makes the most sense.

    Start looking , in commercial boat places not with the yachty broker.

    However 80 ft is a monsterous sized boat , go on board a couple and decide what you would do with the room. Hotel for 40 folks ?



    FF
     
  11. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Roi Soleil

    If you really want to do that size vessel, this is the one I would look to be my guide.

    Roi Soleil
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/dutch-barge-long-distance-cruisers-11316-20.html#post455644

    roi_soleil_canal_du_midi_provence_the_camargue_and_languedoc_and_burgundy_2009.jpg

    ...or perhaps a little smaller one like this, ...or modified
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/dutch-barge-long-distance-cruisers-11316-20.html#post455651
     
  12. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Steel Steel Steel Hard chine 3mm-- easy -- a weeks work,--- well a month then.
     
  13. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Plastic Canal Boat?

    I agree Frosty, with the steel construction.

    But as a design exercise I had wondered at one time if one might utilize one major I-beam of steel as the backbone, and then the rest of the hull in polypropylene cored flat sheets for both hull skins and frames & stringers....all bonded in with methacrylate ahesives ??? ...if you didn't have welding materials around....or you maybe wanted lower maintenance cost...or whatever

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/materials/anyone-have-experience-nidacore-polypropylene-honeycomb-25650.html

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/materials/polypropylene-honeycomb-panels-hull-construction-31600.html

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/fiberglass-composite-boat-building/deck-hull-joint-4559.html
     
  14. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Sure --its fresh water, not the same corrosion to worry about, but a beam for 80 foot is a concern.

    Whats beam ? 10 foot.
     

  15. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    ferro would be ideal for a canal boat, you can build them light, corrosion is not a problem anyway even in salt. my sail boat is ferro with ply cabin, 28 x 7'9 beam. weight is 3.5 metric tons with 50% ballast ratio. hull is 10 mm thick. built in 1963 and been in salt since new. the hull is as good as the day it was built. after owning plank boats the ferro is a pleasure to own, dry bilge, no dry seams opening up. it is a pity its such a labor intensive job because when built properly they are fantastic boats.
     
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