Canada small craft capacity and floatation standards

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DCockey, Mar 25, 2020.

  1. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Is anyone familiar with the Transport Canada requirements for capacity and floatation which apply to small craft less than 6 meters in length? I have several questions after reading Construction Standards for Small Vessels (2010) - TP 1332 E Note: These requirements are similar to the USCG requirements for small craft but there are significant differences.

    I am interested in responses from anyone knowledgeable about the Transport Canada requirements, not speculation.

    Do the capacity and floatation requirements in Chapter 4 apply to boats without engines or fuel systems?

    4 HULL DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND CALCULATION OF RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM CAPACITIES FOR VESSELS NOT MORE THAN 6 METRES IN LENGTH
    4.1 SCOPE
    4.2 DEFINITIONS
    4.3 RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM SAFETY LIMITS FOR MONOHULL VESSELS
    4.4 FLOTATION REQUIREMENTS FOR MONOHULL VESSELS
    4.5 RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM SAFETY LIMITS FOR PONTOON VESSELS
    4.6 RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM SAFETY LIMITS FOR INFLATABLE AND RIGID HULL INFLATABLE VESSELS .

    On page 7 there is a statement of applicability:
    700. (1) This Part applies in respect of a vessel that is constructed, manufactured or rebuilt in, or imported
    into, Canada in order to be sold or operated in Canada and that is
    (a) propelled or designed to be propelled by an engine;
    (b) permanently fitted with an auxiliary engine; or
    (c) fitted with a fuel-burning appliance or system that uses gaseous fuel, liquefied petroleum gas,
    compressed natural gas or naphtha.
    In Section 4.1 there is another statement of applicability:
    As stated by the Regulations:
    HULL DESIGN
    715. The design of the hull of a pleasure craft that is not more than 6 m in length shall conform to the construction standards for buoyancy, flotation and stability.

    There do not appear to be any sections in Chapter 4 for stability and floatation standards which are specified as being applicable to rigid monohulls without engines.

    In section 4.2 a canoe is defined as having auxiliary propulsion:
    “ Canoe” means a watercraft, designed to be manually propelled, with provision for auxiliary power, ....

    Section 4.4.1 is titled:
    4.4.1 Minimum Flotation Test (Swamped Condition) for Canoes, Inboard or Stern-Drive Powered Monohull Vessels Other than Inflatable

    Section 4.4.2 is titled:
    4.4.2 Level Flotation and Stability Tests (Swamped Condition) for Outboard Powered Monohull Vessels Other than Inflatable

    There are also sections in 4.4 for pontoon boats, inflatables and RIBs. There is not a section for rigid monohulls without an engine.
     
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    I am familiar with them and your guess is as good as mine my friend.
     
  3. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Ike Senior Member

    Basically the Canadian standards are the same at the US, primarily because about 80% of the boats made in Canada are sold in the US and have to comply with US standards. The US Coast Guard and the Canadian Coast Guard have a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) that governs this. However, in addition Canada has adopted much of the ABYC standards for boats that are not covered by US regulations. This means, canoes, kayaks, pontoon boats, inflatables, and RIBS.
    When they speak of stability they are not talking about intact stability (as in doing an inclining experiment) they are referring to swamped stability. Part of the level flotation test is a test that measures the boats stability when swamped with people in the boat. Of course they use weights to simulate the persons weight, and the boat cannot heel more than 30 deg.
    As for whether or not RIBs that are not powered have to meet these standards, I would have to research that.

    Let me correct my own post. There are stability tests for monohul and multihulls (including pontoon boats) in 4.4 nd 4.5 but in the US these are not called stability tests. They are test for maximum persons capacity. Same test. different name.

    I should add that they have also adopted parts of the ISO Standards for Recreatonal craft. Particularly ISO 12217-1 Small Craft - Stability and Buoyancy Assessment and Categorization, Part 1: Non-Sailing Vessels of Hull Length Greater Than or Equal to 6 Metres;
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2020
  4. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Interesting reading (boy my life is getting dull. LOL)
    4.6.2 Recommended Maximum Gross Load Calculation
    4.6.2.1

    WV = the weight of the vessel in kilograms, including deck, railings, console, seats, and any other permanent structures and fittings. For outboard powered vessels, the outboard engine and related equipment weight from Table 4-2 is excluded. For vessels fitted with permanent fuel tanks the fuel weight must be included.

    Our rule at the USCG was if it's not specifically excepted, it's included. This paragraph implies that non-powered inflatables and RIBs are included. They specifically say for outboard powered.. Why say that if non-powered are not included. Anyway you need to put the question to the Canadian Office of Boating safety. It's been so long I don't know the people there any more but if you call the US Coast Guard 202-372-1077 they can give you a contact and a phone number
     
  5. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Ike, thnaks for the response. I'll wait until the current Corona virus situation lessens before contacting the Candian authorities.
     
  6. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Ike Senior Member

    That's Ok Dave. I forgot that the folks at USCG HQ Boating Safety are all working from home, so as far as I know there's no one in the office. If you want I can PM you an e-mail address that I know works.
     
    BlueBell likes this.

  7. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    No hurry Ike.
     
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