Can someone help me with a prop setup

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by West Denny 33, Sep 16, 2020.

  1. West Denny 33
    Joined: Aug 2020
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    Location: West Dennis, MA

    West Denny 33 Junior Member

    Can anyone point me in the direction of who sells propeller shaft configurations like the one in the picture below? Thank you in advance

    [​IMG]
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Are you looking to replace the complete package of propeller, shaft and support bracket?

    If so, what is 'wrong' with the existing arrangement?

    The boat looks very fine indeed - what make is she please?
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It looks pretty normal.
     
  4. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Generally a classic installation like that is designed as a one off (i.e. parts are manufactured/cast as needed) or are typical to each manufacturer models. These include the shaft, the inner shaft log with seal, the outer shaft log with bearing, a strut with bearing, and finally the prop. If you have the parts, you generally can get replacements. See here for a typical offering that can be googled: https://www.classicboatconnection.com/underwater_gear_props_rudders_couplers.pdf

    If you want to specify a shafting set-up from scratch, it will need to be designed specific to the hull and engine. The engine hp and necessary propeller diameter will set the location of the propeller, which sets the rake of the shaft and engine beds (or you could set the rake for off-the-shelf components). Knowing the rake of the shaft allows the location of the shaft log, strut, and length of shaft to be determined. The hp and shaft length determine the diameter of the shaft, which allows for selection of the strut and shaft log fittings.
     
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  5. West Denny 33
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    West Denny 33 Junior Member

    Ah so that's why I'm not seeing many on-line. I'm early in planning stages of a runabout build and trying to figure out what way to go with driveline.
     
  6. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

  7. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Denny, re the runabout that you are planning on building, have you designed her yourself, or have you bought a set of plans, or are you still trying to decide what type / size of boat to build (in addition to the driveline)?
     
  8. West Denny 33
    Joined: Aug 2020
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    Location: West Dennis, MA

    West Denny 33 Junior Member

    In early process of design, no plans will draw my own plans, I posted a pic on another post of what I am shooting for (may change after seeing another design) and let me clarify to you all that this is a going to be a small 12'-14' runabout that will only be used on a no wake salt water river that leads to ocean. This is not a boat that is intended to be run around in ocean due to size at speed. Where I plan to use this has a beach at end where I plan to beach/anchor it. Outboard seems easiest but I am not sure it will look with one so considering all options.
     
  9. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The boat you posted is designed to be run at high speeds. They handle badly at low speeds. It is also an antique design that has been superseded for better ones decades ago. The propeller, along with the rest, can't be designed individually but is part of the whole. I suggest you buy plans to end with a better product. Many amateurs are set of designing their own boat. However, a successful design involves a thorough understanding of hull behavior, machinery and structures. The question you ask is very basic and shows you don't have the knowledge required for a good design. It may sound harsh, but is the reality of design. A planing warped bottom hull is not what you need for your application. Start by writing a statement of requirements (SOR) and that will drive the design.
     
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  10. bajansailor
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Here is a link to Denny's previous thread -
    Looking to build a 12' run around https://www.boatdesign.net/threads/looking-to-build-a-12-run-around.64316/

    Denny, re your 'no wake' river, what is the maximum allowable speed on the river? I am thinking that if it is no wake for a 14' boat, then you are looking at only about 5 or 6 knots at the most?
    You mention that you want to beach it - in which case then it would be useful to have easy access over the bow?

    Re choice of engine - the logical choice would be a small outboard motor, unless you want to install a small electric motor, but this will be a LOT more expensive.
     
  11. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Let's do a theoretical exercise: let's suppose that West Denny 33 wants to design/build a boat like the one in the photo in post # 1, or similar. Starting from that premise, and I see no reason to choose any other, "could someone help him with a prop setup? ".
    With that being done, the OP may like to hear opinions about why he should design / build a different boat.
     
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  12. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    I concur, there are many reasons that I/O and V-drive came to dominate inboard performance runabouts, but there is something refined about a barrel-back or slipper stern "gentleman's runabout".
     
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  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I don't know that I would call them refined. Have you ever run one? They are noisy, wet and pound.
     
  14. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    A Gentleman does not go yachting when it is rough, that would upset the Ladies hats.
     
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  15. West Denny 33
    Joined: Aug 2020
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    Location: West Dennis, MA

    West Denny 33 Junior Member

    You are correct this boat will not see over 5-6 mphs this is to a be a "fancy" skiff-runabout (probably expensive) to tool me and wife around on days we don't take a real boat out.

    I am in early stages of figuring out design and propulsion of it, I can't finalize things until I know what will propel it so I am exploring options and pricing of them. I know that an outboard is probably easiest way to go but it is going to ruin the look of the boat, this is probably going to get Gonzo fired up but with this project I am after looks most. As stated I am new to boating but have pretty solid technical/hands on background and as prior projects have shown know how to keep my self out of trouble. The ability to raise the prop when close to the beach would be helpful but not a necessity I can always stop just shy of hitting ground and dropping anchor if prop is fixed. I appreciate the help to my question of where can I source these parts to allow me to perform my cost analysis :)
     
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