Can someone direct me to get patterns for cuts on a vbow aluminum boat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by josahall, Oct 13, 2015.

  1. josahall
    Joined: Oct 2015
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    josahall New Member

    17 foot long 5 foot bottom. 7 foot beam. Can not wrap my head around the cuts in the front to pull a vee. 7° bottom. I want the deck of the boat flat like a bass boat. No curl up on the bow.
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'm not sure what you are asking, but it sounds like you could use some cheap disposable sheet material to experiment with till you get what shape you want, then use that as your pattern.
     
  3. josahall
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    josahall New Member

    That crossed my mind but cardboard probably will not shape the same as aluminum
     
  4. josahall
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    josahall New Member

    Any ideas on a material? 17' sheet of aluminum is 300$ and if I mess up I'll mess up two
     
  5. Oleboynow

    Oleboynow Previous Member

    Besttdraw itin freeship

    Use 4mm ply aspattern
    The way you descibe you can do ittle without a stem bar in place
    By the way you are descibing straight sheer:))
    There is a simple free design program called Carlsen hulls or something
    If you do not you wall have a mess
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Josahall, welcome to the forum.

    Your experience is showing. Cardboard, stiff paper, plastic sheeting (Mylar, etc.), plywood and other "sheet" goods all act the same, when bent into conical and cylindrical shapes. These "developed" shapes are very commonly employed, regardless of sheer shape and type. I do believe your basic problem is, you're attempt to design something you have little grasp on. This isn't a personal dig at you, lots of folks would love to self design a boat, but quickly find the engineering and hydrostatic stuff overwhelming.

    What is so special about your design, that a set of stock plans, possibly with some modifications by you, can't accomplish? Simply put, the size range you're looking at is literally the most popular, with hundreds of stock designs to choose from. Many of these designs are cheap (less than $100) and with modest styling and cosmetic alterations, can become just the right boat for you, without having to understand anything about hydrodynamics and structural engineering concepts.
     
  7. southerntidefan
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    southerntidefan Junior Member

    I've designed and built major pieces of machinery. I'm in the upper tier of fabricators. Cardboard works on 2-3 foot pieces. We are talking about a 7 foot span. How does someone end up in the top tier of welder/fabricator? Asking questions. I'm not in over my head and the rest of the boat is no issue. It's the cuts to for the vbow. Every set of stock plans I've seen is plywood styled or the front of the boat curls up like an elf shoe.
     
  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I am not sure this is a fabrication problem, or a design problem. It sounds like something is being flung together, on the hop.
     
  9. southerntidefan
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    southerntidefan Junior Member

    I'd not spend 1600$ to just sling something together. Is there real expertise here? Or should I keep looking?
     
  10. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Does Josahall = southerntidefan ?
     
  11. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Experiment with cardboard models. Once you have a shape you like scale to full size and experiment with inexpensive thin plywood.
     
  12. JR-Shine
    Joined: May 2004
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    JR-Shine SHINE

    I recommend either learning the software. A few programs are free and most are easy to learn. You could hire someone to do it for you.
     
  13. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    My opinion: Cardboard models have a very short learning curve, and provide direct physical feedback of what is possible with developable surfaces. Software can be very useful after the user has spent sufficient time to learn how to use the software for design. For developable surfaces the user needs to be careful that the surfaces from the software are close enough to developable for their requirements. Cardboard models should be inherently extremely close to exactly developable.
     
  14. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    A proper building form with appropriately placed ribbands will allow the material to be directly marked with precision. Such a form will also reveal whether or not the panel is developable. In addition, a building form will assure that the boat is neither twisted, hooked, or that it will have other unintended features.
     

  15. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    That method works if the builder is starting a mold which requires already having a design with the hull shape. josahall/southerntidefan may not have a design and wants to create a satisfactory shape by pulling together the edges of a pre-cut flat sheet, similar to some "stitch and glue" plywood boats.
     
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