Can my boat go faster?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by captainstick, Jul 26, 2018.

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  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    Location: usa

    fallguy Senior Member

    The best way to speed is to lighten.

    The VW might be fun to look at, but real impractical.

    The decks steel is also trouble.

    Lighten the ship and you'll get safety and speed.

    It'd lose some charm, but aluminum girders and a foam sole and a foam cabin would result in more speed and make the upriver run possible.

    Even plywood beats steel done right.
     
  2. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: Victoria BC Canada

    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    This is a very important concept, as Fallguy has mentioned as well.
    Your current rig has charm for sure and I commend you for getting out there,
    but you want to go fast, and your rig just isn't built for speed.
    10 knots is fast believe it or not.
    Both my brother and sister had VW vans, awesome, but not a Porsche.
    I think I've made my point.
     
  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I suppose if the VW drives; it is practical, but only if..
     
  4. captainstick
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Colorado

    captainstick Greg

    This is definitely an option I am considering. Thanks
     
  5. captainstick
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    captainstick Greg

    I'm using 4 bladed props with an 11 pitch. The motors max out at a little less than 5000 rpm's. I was using a 9 pitch when I only had one motor, but that was too light when the 2nd motor was added. Maybe 10's would have been better.
     
  6. captainstick
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Colorado

    captainstick Greg

    Thanks, people seem to love the boat for the most part. For what it is, it's really stable, durable, and reliable. Fast is relative. I was lapping the houseboats on lake powell, so maybe 10 mph is fast enough for this thing. Going back to 2 pontoons, making them longer, and lightening the boat, all seem like a pretty good idea. It won't cost much money, just a lot of time.

    I guess my main hesitation is that compared to doing all of that work, it seems like I could start over with a new more sea worthy design. In that case, everything is back on the table. I completely understand that some will find it nuts to start with a 2000lb car as the cabin, but that's the only part of the design that's not negotiable for me. That being said, I could have done a better job stripping weight off it. If I start over, the 1st priority is to get the vw bus a lot lighter.

    I'm thinking of making something like a catamaran out of it like you were suggesting previously. Stitch & glue seems doable. I've never welded aluminum, but I can learn. Does anyone have any catamaran book recommendations that someone with 8th grade math could comprehend?
     

  7. captainstick
    Joined: Nov 2013
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    Location: Colorado

    captainstick Greg

    Do you mind estimating what my boat speed would be if I take it back to 2 pontoons? I would extend them by 5 feet each at the stern to get my buoyancy where it needs to be. At the water line, they are 3 feet wide. I think I can drop about 500lbs of weight, but lets just say the weight stays the same for the math. I'm just curious how much difference it makes to have 2 longer pontoons vs what I have now.
     
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