Can i replace Inboard with Outboard on shaft

Discussion in 'Inboards' started by Brian Blake, Dec 26, 2017.

  1. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    try michigan motorz. they should be able to ship to you. you can down size a 350
    with out problums
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I didn't realize you where in NZ. The SBC is a venerable commodity, taken for granted in this country. 10's of millions sold and they're everywhere. In your country, I'm sure the same is true with possibly a different engine. Shipping several hundreds of pound across the Pacific will be costly.

    Looking for engines online isn't the best way to find a deal. The local bone yard will have many dozens of each make and model. This is the place to start and to find a deal. I just purchased a new HEMI, which came out of a Charger, including the transmission and brain, for less than $2,500.

    You still need to identify what you have (engine) and the boat, so you can determine what you need.
     
  3. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    missinginaction Senior Member

    I was looking at the photos you posted of your inline diesel. Of course it may well be "sketchy" but as PAR suggested you'll never know until you make an attempt to get her started. I've seen a lot worse looking photos of engines that run. I've seen diesels in abandoned boats that have sat for years 1/2 full of water. Just last year my boat club auctioned off a 30+ year old Hatteras with twin Caterpillars. The owner had died and his widow hadn't paid the yard charges in years so eventually we had to take legal action. I shook my head when a couple of us were looking at it. Water wasn't quite over the oil dip sticks but it was right up there. Long story short, this guy bids $350.00 and wins (nobody else wanted to deal with it). A few weeks later I'm in the yard and both engines are running. Do you have a friend or someone you know who could put you in touch with a reputable diesel mechanic? If so, offer the mechanic a little money to come down and just take a look and perhaps point you in the right direction. Reputable is the key word. If NZ is anything like New York there are a lot of people who are passing themselves off as marine mechanics who are irresponsible and incompetent. You have to work to find the good ones.

    There are certainly people in NZ who make their living rebuilding engines. Perhaps you could make some inquiries among boaters or the car enthusiast crowd and find a reputable rebuilder who would give you an honest assessment. It's going to be much easier to work with what you have there, if it's worth rebuilding. Marine transmissions can be rebuilt as well. No matter which way you go, take your time, gather your information and make a reasoned decision.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Good info MIA. There's good medical doctors and diesel mechanics, just like there are bad ones in both fields. I usually have a few key questions that I pose, to check out if the guy has a clue about what to do. I'll ask about the engine family, to see if he knows the engine, it's various sizes and model run changes. These things can be looked up online, so you can be "armed" for the encounter with the mechanic. Next, ask for his recommendation, to see if he tosses an option between a total rebuild or maybe just a top end and reseal job. There's a big difference in cost and labor between the two.

    It's pretty rare for an engine to be completely toast, particularly a diesel. Rust can be machined off, bores redrilled, seals and bearings replaced, etc. Don't get me wrong, sometimes it's just not worth the bother, but it's the evaluation that's important. NZ has a fine and healthy marine community, trust them. In other words ask around and see who they trust, to work on their diesels. Lastly, get the make, model and year of the boat, as you don't know if that's an original, equivalent or replacement engine of the appropriate size, without this information. It may very well turn out that the hull is semi-displacement, which means you can get away with a low HP diesel. On the other hand, it may have been the only thing the previous owner had available, so he stuffed in in there. I suspect she's a full plane boat (I could be wrong) and needs 150 HP or more, for best performance.
     
  5. Singleinboard
    Joined: Jan 2018
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    Location: Philadelphia

    Singleinboard New Member

    Hi all, sorry to jump in but new user and trying to hunt down a replacement v drive for my 1972 Silverton 27 single Chrysler inboard. Chrysler 360 with Paragon trans and Paragon V drive. Water - not oil cooled.

    I see previous posts about this boat. The water cooled paragon v drive has been impossible to find. Im told a velvet drive trans and walter vdrive may do the trick but sure could use some advise on how it will bolt in.

    Please adviser with any adviser on how to handle this. Thanks !
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You should start your own thread rather than taking over someone else's. It is the polite way to communicate in a forum.
     
  7. Brian Blake
    Joined: Dec 2017
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    Brian Blake Junior Member

    HI There, i'm off to relocate the boat next weekend (weather permitting). I am considering either towing it with my 17ft fizz which has a 70hp Johnson on it, or i am thinking about making up a bracket which can bolt through existing gaps in the duckboard and then mounting an outboard on it (around 15-30hp) just to get it back. I have to cross a reasonably busy channel and travel about 23 km to the point where it will be lifted out and put on the dry. In either case i would run the fizz boat alongside, but i am leaning towards putting a larger temp outboard on it so its technically under its own steam rather than being towed. Does anyone have any thoughts? Thanks again for all your help.
     
  8. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    temp outboard all day long bud; just make sure the propeller is bigger and not smaller or you'll lack steering, and of course, make sure the mount is good enough as no one here can verify what you are doing

    then you probably need a second person onboard as you will probably have a really hard time seeing what's in front of you if you are running a kicker

    towing sucks, it is really slow and it sucks

    put a rope behind the silverton and tow your other boat with the silverton? probably better to have someone else run the smaller boat for you - maybe run handhelds
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Lets see, rig up a boat with an engine, controls and steering, hoping it all works, doesn't fall off and then having another boat rafted up, just in case you're rig does have something go wrong? Yep, towing sucks, but at least you have one boat if you're rafted up. No one needs be on the other boat and yeah it's slow, but you'll get there with less headache. Just strap her on good and go at a manageable speed.
     
  10. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Yup; you can tow it alone. Tiller motor on the Silverton is likely a two man job.

    Towing still sucks.
     
  11. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Agreed, towing sucks, but I prefer to raft up and drag, rather then tow if the tow boat is big enough which it sounds to be in this case. Getting the two boats tied together, so they handle moderately well, usually takes some fiddling with lines and stuff, but you'll find a position the two will get along much better with themselves (mostly). A fair number of fenders and a good bit of line, is all it needs to be. Towing is easier, though you have a lot less control, especially in cross winds, contrary currents, steering, etc. I've had better luck towing, if I rafted up a dinghy along side and used it's rudder to steer the boat being towed, but you still don't have any brakes and the dinghy's rudder may not be big enough to offer more than a vague illusion of steering control, plus the additional drag of towing two boats. My usually fall back position is based on the distance of the tow. If it's relatively a short distance (a couple of miles or less), I'll just tie a line to the bow and drag it there, knowing some inventive cursing and name calling will be involved. If the water patch is longer and/or rougher, I'll raft them up and steer the tow boat at 45 degrees the whole way there, but have much better control along the way.
     
  12. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Probably the best idea. A lot of ifs both the other ways. If the tow hooks/line survive 20 miles, if the motor mounts up well, if you have two people, just to name a few.

    The only if on the rafting is if you tighten up and fender well. Both are controllable before leaving the dock. Rafting will be tricky because the freeboard on the biggerboat is much higher most likely. Wrap some tires up maybe.... more cleats than less to even the loads.

    Its a great suggestion.
     
  13. Brian Blake
    Joined: Dec 2017
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    Brian Blake Junior Member

    Thank you all. I think i'll have a look at the Rafting option, with a 20hp bolted to the duckboard "just in case" . Just looking at a few guides online it seems that Rafting them shouldn't be too bad, but until i have them side by side i'm not sure.

    Is there any particular dangers or things to watch out for when rafted and underway?

    Thanks again.
    Brian
     
  14. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I haven't done it, so I could only offer my own fears. Ripping out a cleat on the rafting vessel would be the first thing. Too much motion between the two vessels underway or in waves. Running the rafting vessel at WOT and potentially overheating? I would probably use cleats on both sides of the tow vessel, but maybe Paul will jump back in an offer his ideas.
     

  15. Brian Blake
    Joined: Dec 2017
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    Brian Blake Junior Member

    Thanks again all of you.

    I think i'm going to go with a 15hp on a bracket on the Duckboard. If we have any issues with the outboard or bracket assembly i will raft together (although the freeboard issue is a consideration as there is probably 1-1.5 ft in difference) and motor both back side by side. Failing that i'll have a tow option up my sleeve also. I;ve changed the place where i am bringing it out so I now have a less busy waterway and a track of 10.6 miles or 17km to travel so i'm a little more confident in this arrangement.

    I've attached a rough sketch(Clearly i'm no architect, but this is easy enough) of what i'm proposing to make for the outboard bracket using 40mm thick lengths of treated timber and some solid coach bolts and then a series of several holes drilled through the base plate to feed bolts through the duckboard webs (Similar to the picture attached). I plan on putting roughly 8-10 bolts through the duckboard to line up with the existing holes/webs and then either a solid plate or smaller positional plates underneath the duckboard which catch the bolt head and essentially "clamp" the duckboard in 8-10 places (to distribute weight and flex). At 15hp and in a fairly calm sea its going to be a reasonably slow trip with the fizz boat following. This drawing is a bit rudimentary but i'll butt the horizontal and vertical join and probably also dowel it with 12mm coach bolts vertically for additional strength.

    Does this seem a reasonably sound plan before i dash off and wind up with both boats on the bottom of the Hauraki Gulf?

    I found out yesterday that the previous owner has basically been squatting on someone else's mooring as theirs broke quite some time ago. So the harbor master has "gently" asked me to get it moved. Watch this space, but any advice or improvements to design are greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
    Brian
     

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