can anyone tell me what this boat is modeled after

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Boston, Nov 10, 2008.

  1. rfnk
    Joined: Sep 2008
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    rfnk Junior Member

    This boat you're thinking of building doesn't look very seaworthy to me! `Metre' class boats were never (or rarely anyway) built for their seaworthiness. If you're planning to build a small yacht for coastal cruising and you want it to be trailerable, why not build a Folkboat? The Folkboat's seaworthiness is legendary, all rigging etc. is available at relatively low cost and the boat was designed to be built with relative ease. The Folkboat is admired wherever she goes too!
     
  2. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    I grew up on cape cod and worked lobster for a few summers in all weather
    so I know what you are saying about the look

    [​IMG]

    I think there is nothing for it
    Im talking two boats here
    one would make a nice day sailor/weekender
    that I can build in the back yard and schlep to the water from time to time
    and another that would be a nice coaster up to Ketchikan

    the coaster would need to be built near the water
    and be a lot safer than the sq m cruisers say in a hard following sea
    or a squall
    but for around here Im getting sold on the sq m boats for the beauty and speed
    and I can sail it at Grandbe and lake Powell
    if I end up building Estlander
    Ill leave in the stringers I bend the frames on, and make em out of white oak to boot
    put in some decent floors maybe even a keelson and hangin knee's and whatever it takes
    that should stiffen it up considerable and not change the handling much
    as I hear they tend to break ribs and flex a lot

    the Folkboat is nice
    but if Im going to aim for indestructible
    I might as well build a friendship sloop

    [​IMG]

    its got a capsize ratio of 1.75
    might come in handy in rough conditions
    and this boat has proved itself in the hardest of northeasters and even a few hurricanes without a loss
    its max sinusoidal wave potential is about 22 feet
    its also designed with a forward hatch so you could, in really rough conditions, stand in the hatch and take in a reef or two or work the storm jib
    in relative safety
    its also got nice accommodations
    not the Paris Hilton but nice enough
    on the down side
    its expensive
    you would want the jib and head sails on rollers
    and its a gaff rigged so you would have a lot more hardware and rigging
    its got a ton of sail area
    over five sails
    and they would likely need to be custom made
    along with the rigging
    not an easy single hander
    ( something to consider in case some one gets injured )
    and it takes a lot of lead in the keel
    3 tons
    leads not cheep
    this one is the bomb to bring you home but
    my wallet is cringing already

    If I had my druthers
    ild be sailing a lengthened version of the friendship sloop up the west coast

    but Im still looking
    and still appreciating your suggestions
    thanks folks
    keep em coming

    oh
    bntii
    that link you sent was great
    much appreciated
     
  3. Hansen Aerosprt
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: SF Bay

    Hansen Aerosprt Junior Member

    Boston:
    Sounds like you need a Tumlaren or Stor Tumlaren (bigger version) to satisfy the Skerry cruiser itch and also do some cruising. Adlard Coles got good use of 'Cohoe' and wound up writing a book about 'Heavy Weather Sailing' in the process. They can be found still for a decent price. A nice Knud Rheimers 34' version was for sale in SF last year - here is a pic at the dock. You can read about Josephine, a 30' version here: http://www.rnyc.org.uk/sailing/josephine/2003.htm

     

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  4. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    No problem Boston,

    This was a fun foray into some designs I did not really know much about.
    On plans- a quick look around finds that there are current builds being done. Boats build up plank on frame as designed in the 20's 30's. I see reference to books with 'original' plans and a few single sheets from plans posted. I think the class associations could steer you in the right direction. One thing I found remarkable is the sheer number of designers and varied boats produced from this period... It must have been a fun time with strong participation to have so much design interest.

    The six meter guys are intent on documenting the boats. See:

    "A set of plans for every Six, part I & II"

    On ballast- around here smallish glass boats go for salvage prices all the time (a few hundred bucks). The lead keel from one of these could be recast for your project.
     
  5. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Boston, and others.

    I have been studying the Skerry Cruisers a lot lately for the development of the Scandinavian Cruiser 40 (SC 40) which I have been designing for a Danish client. The boat originally posted definitely looks like a Skerry Cruiser to me.

    The SC 40 is modelled on the same lines as the Skerry Cruisers, which celebrate their 100th birthday this year (2008). The hull is long and narrow with long overhangs. Everything else, however, is a little different. The SC 40 has a lifting keel, lifting rudder, and a free-standing wingmast rig. The boat will be built in China and shipped on its own trailer complete in a shipping container. It is quite a viable boat-in-a-box.

    At the request of the client, we have designed two versions. The first is the Sport Cruiser which has the longer coachroof and shorter cockpit. The Day Boat has a shorter coachroof and longer cockpit. Drawings and renderings are posted here. The renderings are completely computer generated and they show the Sport Cruiser. The sail plans of the two versions are shown here, and we are working on the renderings for the Day Boat. You can see a more complete story of the design on my website at:

    http://www.sponbergyachtdesign.com/SC40.htm

    I am interested in everyone's opinions on this design--which would you favor, the Sport Cruiser, which is better equipped for sleeping on board and being used as a weekender; or the Day Boat, which would be strickly a daysailer. Please post your comments here. I also welcome private comments if you wish.

    Thanks,

    Eric
     

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  6. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    WOW!
    Very attractive. I find the SC version to be a nicer look and would choose the ability to weekend/overnight.
     
  7. PI Design
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    PI Design Senior Member

    They look fantastic. Personally I would pick the Sport version - the ability to overnight really lets you use the boat a lot more.
    I know you have a lot of experience with free standing rigs, but that looks a pretty big rig to cantilever.
     
  8. Hansen Aerosprt
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Hansen Aerosprt Junior Member

    Can't imagine why anyone would want a 40' strictly daysailor.
    Love the free-standing rig. Mine is 52' on a 34' boat. Works great!
     

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  9. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Hansen
    thanks
    I will definitely check out his book
    Ive always been a little iffy about double enders
    and would love to hear what he has to say

    B
    IM stuck inland for the time being so not much salvage lead available
    although I could buy over the phone and have it ripped out and shipped
    again the link was great
    dam helpful stuff in there

    Eric
    your design is one of the nicest Ive seen in years
    I even like the girl on the back
    nice touch
    # of sq ft in lateral resistance of the keel seems a bit light
    given the 43 sq meters of sail she can carry
    and that is before some fool like myself slaps a Genoa gib on her
    seems like Ild be slipping sideways a little
    I like it enough to consider building one
    but it would have more lateral resistance bellow the line
    ( if I bought instead of build my sires, to generations beyond remembering, would rise from there graves and curse the very ground I walk on, I can hear the moaning now )
    and ya, Ild go for the cruiser

    reminds me a lot of this one Im considering

    [​IMG]

    by the way
    I couldnt find anything on this boat
    its the Fara from 1938
    did a google search but no go
    Ill keep looking but if anyone recognizes it
    feel free to throw me a bone

    it was the end of the golden age
    the height of the craft
    when any of the shipwrights then
    could outshine any of us today
    I envy them there skill

    [​IMG]

    this boat is a pilot schooner from the turn of the century
    it has a capsize ratio of 1.48
    and not only is it near impossible to get her on her beam ends
    but rolled its angle of vanishing stability is pretty much upside down
    and even being kinda beamy
    its got a 14 deg angle of entrance at the wl
    and this ones a redesign of one that had even greater stability
    I got to agree with bntii
    it was a great time for designers
    hats off to the masters

    and cheers mates
    B
     
  10. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: MD

    bntii Senior Member

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Boston- on Fara. Go to this link and look down page:

    http://www.squareskerryyachts.net/30m/index.html

    "July 12, 2008: Andries Oosenbrugh of The Netherlands emails he recently purchased a Scottish Thirty, FARA, K-15, designed and built by Alfred Mylne in 1938. The Beken and Cowes photo below is also pictured in Uffa Fox's 1938 annal, "Thoughts on Yachts and Yachting." Her first owner is listed as Colonel W. Woodie. Woodie was vice-chairman of the British 30-Square Metre Association. He served alongside Col. H.S.C. Richardson, owner of the Uffa Fox designed Thirty, SEA SWALLOW.

    Andries reports FARA is double skinned, "spruce inside and mahogany outside on rock elm frames," and that FARA was "a barn find" in excellent condition. He is starting efforts on a refit. He promises pictures of his progress. Any other gems out there?"

    Sorry- got a little carried away with the photos...

    She is being restored:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    way to go
    and no being sorry
    I like books with lots of pictures
    :)

    Im thinkin that Im going to build something much like the Fara
    but with stringers and some bulk heads left in for greater strength in a pinch
    ( god only knows what I might hit )
    Ill cold mold her over steam bent
    and put in so many molds she will turn out perfect

    that boat is kinda like walking into the chocolate factory
    I just gotta have one

    Ill just sail it in Dillon or Granby
    and leave off using it as a coaster for a more specific build
    Ive developed a healthy respect for the water
    and I dont want to develop any more

    although the Nordic seafaring tradition is among the finest
    I want something a little beamier
    more free board
    and still looks good in a bikini
    :)
    ( I could go on but my goofy sense of humor would only get me in trouble )
     
  12. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

  13. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  14. Eric Sponberg
    Joined: Dec 2001
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    Location: On board Corroboree

    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Boston,

    The keel on the SC 40, remember, is a much more efficient aerofoil shape than the original Skerry Cruisers when a lot less was known about efficient keel shapes. My studies to date show that I have sufficient keel area, comparable to other designs that I have done. So I have confidence that this keel will work. The depth of the keel is, in part, a function of the height of the opening in the front end of the container when the keel is retracted and the boat is sitting on the trailer.

    This boat design will not be available to the public for DIY construction. My client has bought the rights to the design--it will be built only in production fiberglass by a builder in China.

    Thank you for your vote on your choice of version. I welcome other readers to express their preference for either the Sport Cruiser version or the Day Boat version. Thanks.

    Eric
     

  15. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    well congrats on the sale
    Im sure she will do well
    the container idea is great for shipping them
    save a fortune on delivery charges
    best
    B
     
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