Can a Carbon Fiber/Kevlar Hull be made bullet Proof?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by PsychicWarrior, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. PsychicWarrior
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    PsychicWarrior Junior Member

    We all know the latest in High Tech Materials GRP is stiffer, stronger and lighter than steel yet at the point of impact, all falls appart literally.

    Does anyone know if they have yet made materials to make this type of hull bullet proof? Of course the question then is what kind of bullet /gun.. but just assume we say a 9 mm pistol at close range..

    Who knows what ?
     
  2. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    9mm pistol at close range is lucky to penetrate you skin, never mind a boat hull.....try it one day at the range, you will be surprised.
     
  3. PsychicWarrior
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    PsychicWarrior Junior Member

    Hmmm - let's try it Landlubber.. you meet me at the range and we will put an apple on your head and give you a cigarette.. ok ? ;-)
     
  4. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Nothing is bulletproof, only bullet resistant. Just keep shooting enough at the same spot and you'll get through.
     
  5. PsychicWarrior
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    PsychicWarrior Junior Member

    True.. but I am just concerned about 1 Bullet ..can any kind of hi-tech material hold up to even that ? Steel would only get dented.
     
  6. b1ck0
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    b1ck0 Senior Member

  7. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Bullet proof vest usually consist of 3 layers.

    The first layer is aramid (not the typical Kevlar 49 variety). Aramid has high shear strength and would prevent most bullets from penetrating. The aramid is also flexible so as the bullet impacts, it gives and the load is transferred to a greater area reducing "bullet shock". Carbon fiber is not used in the first layer.

    As the bullet deforms and breaks up into smaller pieces, it still has velocity. Soft, cotton like fiberglass or kevlar fibers slows down the little fragments and help in dissipating the impact.

    As it nears the body, small fragments that escapes the second layer is stopped by a high density, high denier closely weaved fabric. In the old days, "trevira" was adequate but today the norm is high denier weave carbon or aramid.

    Bullet proof vest have a rating depending on range of fire and the caliber of bullet it will stop. Not all bulletproof vest will stop a bullet.

    I am not an expert on "bulletproof". Google is the word that suits.:D
     
  8. ChrisN67
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    ChrisN67 Senior Member

    Bullet proof? It is an open-ended question. It would help if you identify the standard.

    Some references have been made to Body Armor (garment proection) in which case you should refer to a NIJ (national institute of justice) standard:
    : http://www.chiefsupply.com/resources/ba-nij.asp
    : http://www.chiefsupply.com/docs/Body-Armor-NIJ-06-Standard.pdf

    If you are referering to an "armoring" situation (which is more appropriate for a vehicle/boat) then the attached table would assist in the level of threat protection. In all cases, the higher the level the more weight and material needed.
     

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  9. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    9mm Parabellum with 115gr FMJ bullet has 420 ft lbs of muzzle energy. I suppose Kevlar in a laminate would stop it. There's a lot of research available on bulletproofing cars which can tell you more. Who only shoots one bullet? That's why 9mm weapons are semi or full auto.
     
  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    You know.

    Or didn´t you read all the replies to your same question on the other thread?

    What is the rationale behind your stubborn attempts to circumnavigate reality?

    I told you already, NO hull material is bullet proof. A loose, multilayer "curtain" of fabric (Aramid, glass, or toilet tissue) between the hull and interior furnishing would be the easiest way to stop bullets from penetrating through to the interior. Any rigid material has it´s limits far below the size we could use to build a boat. (given the fact, that the one shot 9mm Para was just a joke, as ALL your requirements by so far)

    Regards
    Richard
     
  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Fly on the Wall - Miss ddt yet?

    LOL :)
     
  12. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    OK, now you're being silly.
     
  13. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Landlover. you must not be shooting Corbon 125 gr. JHP + P
     
  14. ChrisN67
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    ChrisN67 Senior Member

    Not sure where this thread is going; but as someone who has spent years working in Iraq AND own a boat registered / moored in Kuwait that has transported US contractors to Iraq; I can tell you that making a boat "bulletproof" has little meaning to me .

    Speed is your best friend and a boat has significant orders of magnitude of surface area to be "armored" to the point that if you wanted to make it A10 / NIJ IV it would sink or move like a tank with a hamster drive system. By the time you armor to that level the last thing you might remember on your first trip to the kill zone would be the RPG7 heading your way.

    In short, you are better off using the added money for armoring to put into hardening only vital engineering areas and a small cockpit. The rest should go into big engines and light construction to help minimize exposure in the kill zone.
     

  15. cardsinplay
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    cardsinplay da Vinci Group

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