Cable or Chain Ferry

Discussion in 'Propulsion' started by oliver.ilg, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. oliver.ilg
    Joined: May 2009
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    oliver.ilg Junior Member

    Dear Members,

    we have been asked to manage a cable ferry project in Brazil.

    Therefore I'm looking for any advice, specially regarding manufacturers of equipment to power such a ferry.

    Anyone out there with experience or knowledge regarding this kind of propulsion?

    Thanks, Oliver
     
  2. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I do not understand what is a "cable ferry" boat. Is it a boat moving pulling a cable?. Could you please elaborate more what the mission is, what work should make that kind of boat?.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Fixed river crossings where there is no bridge.
     
  4. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

  5. oliver.ilg
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    oliver.ilg Junior Member

    A cable Ferry is a Ferry boat that crosses a portion of water using cables (or chains) for movement, instead of propellers. I've seen ones with one, two or three cables on a research on the net.

    You'll find some examples here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable_ferry

    all the best
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Pretty sure there was one of those in the movie "Jaws", would have been terrible if the giant fish had severed the cable ! :p
     
  7. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Everything is clear now. It would be important, but essential, to know what size boat are we talking about, among other things. The drive can go from several men pulling a rope, to a large winch to pull and roll the cable (or something similar)
     
  8. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    1 person likes this.
  9. BKay
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    BKay Junior Member

    I'd like to provide you with some brilliant insight, but I can only provide you with slightly-below-average insight. I live within a mile or so of such a system in Virginia. It uses a dumb cable (it appears to be two cables laid across the bottom). The power appears to be onboard the ferry, it looks like they use a diesel generator to power an electric motor that pulls the ferry across the cables.

    I don't know the exact size, but it handles 3-4 vehicles and is captained by an individual with a 6-pack licence (I assume, the sign says "max 6 passengers"). The distance this system covers is approximately 1/4 mile. I understand there has been a ferry at this location for many years (the first one was probably driven by animals).

    It is possible the Virginia Department of Transportation may provide insight. Best of luck.

    http://www.virginiadot.org/travel/sunny_bank_ferry.asp

    http://www.ssentinel.com/index.php/rivah/article/free_ferries_are_an_echo_of_the_past
     
  10. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    They are not too complicated and quite common in Brazil. They both run of a capstan in the middle with wraps around it and guide rollers at each end of the boat. Ferries are symmetrical since they don't turn around. Cable is lighter than chain. It requires enough wraps on the capstan to prevent slipping.
     
  12. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    I've been on several cable/chain ferries.

    One traveled along a guide cable and moved by a capstan pulling on a cable.

    Another one traveled along a guide cable and was propelled a "push" boat. The push boat was fixed at the bow by a bracket on the side of the ferry, and could swing 180 degrees to reverse direction.

    A third traveled along a guide cable but appeared be propelled by propellers on either end.
     
  13. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Also have been a couple of small cable ferries which were propelled by a person pulling on a rope.
     
  14. dougfrolich
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    dougfrolich Senior Member

    two cable ferries near Rio Vista California one is the Real McCoyII and the other is the J-mack. Operated by Cal-Trans.
     

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  15. dougfrolich
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    dougfrolich Senior Member

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 12, 2015
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