Cabin sailboats that will fit in a 40' shipping container ?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Vronsky, Jan 20, 2015.

  1. Vronsky
    Joined: Apr 2014
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    Vronsky Junior Member

    Does any know of cabin sailboats (>22') that will fit in a standard 40' shipping container? Doors of these containers measure 2,33m wide, and 2,28 high
    I know e.g. of Far Harbour 39 (keel needs to go off), and Hurley 700.

    THANKS for any suggestions.

    V.
     
  2. crasch
    Joined: May 2004
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    crasch Junior Member

    It's not exactly what you're asking for, but perhaps the River Trotter barge will be of interest to you anyway:

    http://www.amfitech.se/

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Eric Sponberg
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    Eric Sponberg Senior Member

    Hi Vronsky,

    The Scandinavian Cruiser 40, a daysailer that I did for Scandinavian Cruiser Yachts was intended to be shipped in a container. This design did not get built. SC instead started with a 20'er, two of which could fit in a container. You can read about it on my website here: http://www.sponbergyachtdesign.com/SC40.htm

    The Far Harbor 39, a particularly ugly boat design by Bob Perry, was meant for containerized shipment. I don't know how many were built, certainly one. It's aesthetics, in my opinion, leave much to be desired.

    Eric
     
  4. Vronsky
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    Vronsky Junior Member

    Thx Eric,
    Container shipping seems like an interesting design proposition to overcome ocean crossings: don't understand why this isn't picked up more widely, although I understand the challenges.

    Best,
    V.

     
  5. Hampus
    Joined: Jan 2010
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    Hampus Junior Member

    There are shipping companies that are specialized in shipping boats, and those who are not specialized but do it to fill up deck space. They do it with the boats standing in cradles on the deck. A bit more expensive but not astronomical. Using that method of shipping you wouldn't have to choose your boat based on the size of a container.
     
  6. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    A power boat would be far easier to install in a container.

    Since ocean crossing range is not required why not power?

    You can always carry a sailing dink if you go thru sail withrawal .

    I looked at the Atkin box keel style boat as the easiest to roll on in to a box and remove when at the destination.

    Beachable is always useful.

    With proper hookups on board the port could launch you after the delivery boat departs.
     
  7. Jeremy McKenna
    Joined: Jun 2018
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    Location: Kazakhstan

    Jeremy McKenna New Member

    Hi Vronsky,
    Did you end up finding an adequate solution? I am looking for a cabin boat/roomy daysailer for transportation to Issyk Kul in Kyrgyzstan (about as land-locked as you can get). I think containerized shipping/trucking will be the only viable option. A classic daysailer (with narrow beam) would fit the bill. What a shame Eric's SC40 with lifting keel never made it into production! Chris Bowman's U40 would look stunning against the backdrop of the Tian Shan, but it seems the Taru was a bit of a one-off?
    Ultimately, I may have to settle for a shorter/shallower boat. But if I'm going to go to the trouble, I'd like to cram in as much LOA as possible.
    Any other ideas, anyone?
    Cheers,
    Jeremy
     
  8. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Bolger AS39/LooseMoose
     
  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

  10. CT249
    Joined: May 2003
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    CT249 Senior Member

    Yes, for the guy who designed this;

    [​IMG]
    to be so disparaging about the appearance of this;

    [​IMG]

    is rather odd. They have similar stems and similar long foredecks and visual sheers, and both have quite tall coachroofs stuck well aft.
     

    Attached Files:

    rwatson likes this.
  11. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Is that the Bagatelle E Sponberg designed? Which if it is, its much wider than 8'. Difficult to make any boat with standing hdrm look low and sleek fit into a shipping container and btw, Perry did a great job considering the constraints
     
  12. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Not so much wider B 10-6½”, a mere 2.5 feet

    Bagatelle https://www.ericwsponberg.com/boat-designs/bagatelle/
     

  13. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    That extra 2.5' makes a humongous difference in the sense of spaciousness as well as working out comfortable ergodynamics, one of many reasons I think Perry did an excellent job besides, Bagatelle to wide for container.

    Quite sad idea never took off. FF is on point, going with a powerboat would be way more advantageous
     
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