Building with pyinkado wood

Discussion in 'Materials' started by makobuilders, Oct 17, 2013.

  1. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Atlanta, USA

    makobuilders Member

    Does anyone have any experience, or can comment on, using pyinkado for wood boat construction? Planking as well as frames.
     
  2. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    It is a hardwood, very strong, very durable, and resistant to termites. Those are good reasons to use it in boat building. 3 questions. How heavy is it? Will it bend? How well does it take a finish?
     
  3. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    almost anything and everything in terms of wood has been used to build boats, even bamboo. IF it has reasonably clear and straight grain it can be used. High rot resistance and good fastener holding power is a plus.

    It would take a professional to optimize the structure design around the wood properties so it will not be too heavy. but likely if you can find a traditional boat building wood with similar properties you can substitute this wood on plans calling for the other more common species.
     
  4. makobuilders
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    makobuilders Member

    This is a southeast Asian wood that I have ready access to since we manufacture doors and furniture from it. Pyinkado has some interesting characteristics:

    HARDNESS - Janka harness is double that of teak/oak/mahogany and about triple that of pine. The 1.75" thick doors we build deflect 9mm handgun fire.

    HEAVINESS - same orders of magnetite regarding weight. It sinks in water!

    BEND - Very little bend. I suppose we would need to use a peeler to create 1/8" veneers and then use cold-mold epoxy to laminate frames and planking.

    FINISH - yes it takes varnish well. The natural red color isn't ever stained, but it could be if wanted.

    However, thinking about Petros' comments, perhaps it is not so ideal because of the weight. My thought is for a displacement cruiser so perhaps this isn't so important.
     
  5. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Based on what I just read it would make good keels or centerboards and stem-pieces. It would also make a good rub-rail. It would also make good wood pulleys and handles and trim in high wear areas.
     
  6. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    Also good and durable deck planking if not too heavy. If the design of the boat is such that more hull weight is desirable (Like in a boat used for rough sea conditions), than a whole hull out of it might not be out of the question, as long as adaquate floatation can be designed into it.

    laminating is a good way to make curved hull members.

    As a tropical wood is it also rot resistant? there may be a market for this lumber outside of local market for decking, rub rails or attractive yet tough trim.
     

  7. Sand crab
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Sand crab Junior Member

    Too heavy.
     
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