building with PVC core foam

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by signum, Nov 26, 2005.

  1. signum
    Joined: Aug 2005
    Posts: 50
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 26
    Location: Romania

    signum engineer

    I wish to know if is it possible to work with PVC core foam as plank on frames method similar with marine plywood plank on frames ?
    I was thinking just to laminate with epoxy fiberglass a face, let it cures and than to try planking the laminated sheet on frames with fiberglass face up, I mean to be the exterior of hull. Will it have enough flexural strength don't break the PVC foam? I think to Herex C70.90 from Alcan airex which is a good core for small hull projects. I wonder just if the exterior of hull will be enough smooth after the first lamination with fiberglass on the exterior face. I think should be. I know that lamination must be a first layer of resin on PVC , next a layer of chopped mat , resin again, roving fiberglass bi axial, and again resin.
    Has anybody other opinion?
    Thanks

    Signum
     
  2. D'ARTOIS
    Joined: Nov 2004
    Posts: 1,068
    Likes: 18, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 321
    Location: The Netherlands

    D'ARTOIS Senior Member

    I don't believe it's a very good idea for a variety of reasons.

    If I understand you well, you will use long strips of core (Airex) fasten that to the frames and than laminating the exterior face.

    First of all, I do not believe hat you will be able to get a fair hull i.e. that the so called "core planks" will remain straight and will not lex whilst hardening out if laminated.

    I don't think you won't get a smooth hull either bu that depends also a bit how you build up the layers whilst laminating.

    A 3rd reason not to do it you will not get continuous strength in your laminate because each frame interrupts the continuity of the laminate.

    This is how I see it.
     
  3. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Likes: 109, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1009
    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    However for a repair of a really fine classic ,

    with unobtainable woods & workmanship a case for foam planking can be made.

    Invert the hull, and with a heavy grinder get the fastenings visable and cut around them.
    Number each plank .

    Trace the plank shape in Airex , wrap the plank with matt and use a SS meat skewer to hold the plank against --- into the rib where it came from.

    When all planking is replaced glass the outside with single skin scantlings.

    Fair as you go , and the result will be fast light ,quiet, insulated , and as maint free as any plastic boat.

    Downside , Airex is hardly cheaper than Gold!


    Got a nice 75 ft'er to do?

    FAST FRED
     

  4. Ssor
    Joined: Jan 2005
    Posts: 174
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    Location: Bel Air, Md

    Ssor Senior Member

    Check out coreplank it is made by CoreCell, It is two inch wide cove and bead strips made for building boats from moulds just as you would build a wooden boat that was to be covered with fiberglass. It can be obtained in lenths of sixteen feet, about five meters, and in a variety of thicknesses.
     
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