Building the Eastport Pram time lapse video

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Oceano, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. Oceano
    Joined: Sep 2013
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    Location: Marina del Rey, Los angeles

    Oceano Junior Member

    Here's a seven-minute time lapse of building the Eastport Pram, a kit from
    Chesapeake Light Craft.

    http://vimeo.com/48492165

    And at look at the dinghy sailing:

    http://vimeo.com/50044096

    It's a good first-build project, and at only about 65 pounds makes a versatile tender. Fragile, of course, compared to glass. Sails really well with a standing lug rig that stores entirely inside the boat.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. boat fan
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    Location: Australia

    boat fan Senior Member

    Nice ! :)
     
  3. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    A salty little pram that appears to sail very well indeed. I like it. Resembles the Herreshoff Neria pram.

    Why do you think the ply pram is more fragile than a glass one? An all fiberglas duplicate would also be fragile if it weighed only 60 to 65 pounds.

    On a pound for pound basis, wood remains among the strongest of materials.
     
  4. Oceano
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    Oceano Junior Member

    You have to be quite careful pulling this boat onto a dock, or up on a beach. It's easy to make a deep gouge, and holing it is quite possible. The strakes are 6mm ply, only the bottom and the sole are protected by a layer of glass.

    Treat it like a kayak, not a workboat, and everything's all right.
     
  5. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I am thinking of getting builders who have neat, tidy, organised workshops banned from this forum !

    It sets a bad precedent :D
     
  6. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    Edison is supposed to have said “To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk.”

    The problem is you need a junk shed separate to the workshop, we used to be able to pick over the junk metal pile at the tip, but lawyers have determined that we might sue if we traumatise ourselves, so now we have to have our own piles at home. It's amazing what machinery you can cobble together to get some obscure task accomplished with a pile of junk an angle grinder and a stick welder.

    Great Dinghy.
     
  7. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Great concepts MJ.


    PDW and I were discussing this problem the other day - I said I needed another shed to be able to take PDW's junk off his hands, or even more importantly, getting my own junk out of my shed.

    Then there are the tools - some you use only once or twice a year, but when you need them, you really need them.

    Its the old problem "If you owned everything in the world - where would you put it ?"

    Oceano's approach to boatbuilding - get a plan, buy the material, produce an excellent, great performing product efficiently and neatly, is one way of doing it I suppose :(


    But, if I couldn't make 'improvements', or substitute parts with 'stuff I already have' , or invent a more 'accurate' or 'efficient' way of construction, then it wouldn't have nearly the same appeal.


    Heck, I have just completed the cad drawings to put a high roach mainsail on an Eastport Pram dinghy - with foils ;)
     
  8. Oceano
    Joined: Sep 2013
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    Location: Marina del Rey, Los angeles

    Oceano Junior Member

    Thanks for the comments about my clean workshop. Actually, I have a video editing ap which goes through my videos and, using a clean floor sample on file, paints that all over the sawdust, dead flies and blood droplets under the sawhorses. It's called Shop Vac Video Cleaner, and I recommend it.

    I would like to also recommend making fins out of ordinary plywood, in case you happen to run out of marine plywood. It is a good deal cheaper. All you have to do is put on a couple of coats of epoxy and six coats of varnish and you have a short cut that is not widely known among hidebound wooden boat builders.

    It stands up well to salt water. Here is the proof after one month:
     

    Attached Files:

  9. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Yes, indeed. The proof is in the picture. All this palaver about quality materials and 'proper' ways to build. It all gets so boring.

    Where else could you get such an interesting, artistic, multi-part effect ? I bet the multiple fins provide an amazing hydrodynamic effect.
     
  10. ancient kayaker
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Imagine all the trouble you'd need to go to, to get those exact results with marine ply . . .
     
  11. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    More like banning a robot from building a boat!:p
     
  12. DentonDon
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: Denton, TX

    DentonDon Junior Member

    Great boat and great music!
     
  13. ancient kayaker
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    Location: Alliston, Ontario, Canada

    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    Me too, but we messy builders are too disorganized to make a start . . .
     
  14. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I would get the movement started, but I cant find the proposal in my documents folder :)

    Actually, I have come across a more pressing issue.

    We all know about Murphys law - "if it can happen, it will ... at the worst possible time etc "

    But - I have observed an increase in the effect ! Not only do small bolts or fittings fall to the floor just when they are nearly fastened - but they purposely scurry to the most inaccessible part of the workshop floor !!!

    And when you make that exact cut, the jigsaw purposely distorts the blade right where the joint will be exposed or will make it fit badly. Or the tool blade will break 10 minutes before the hardware shop closes, and you have no hope of getting a spare blade to do all those little trim jobs before the epoxy goes off.

    You may have experienced the effect I am talking about.

    I believe that THINGS are evolving in intelligence, and are now being made by other malevolent machines, to hinder all types of manufacturing.

    I blame the Chinese, who have allowed machine viruses, developed by dissident Tibetans, to infect their factories - a sort of 'mechanistic bird flu'.

    Is it worth developing a whole new web site to expose this phenomena and co-ordinate some serious research efforts into this serious problem ?
     

  15. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Petros Senior Member

    It is called entropy. the amount of disorder in the universe is always increasing. It is a losing battle to try and compensate for it. You can always have brief periods of order (reversing the tread), but it takes energy input to accomplish that. You can not alter the natural course of entropy for long because you simply run out of energy, and than disorder returns with a vengeance.

    I suggest NOT documenting it since it will only increase the entropy (disorder), you will make the phenomenon worse by trying to document it.
     
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