Building RYD-16.9 Rocky - Hull 21

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by John Theunissen, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Hi John, regarding the SS keel plank bolts, best use at least the ones with an A4 grade mark on the head, and not A2.

    It would be even better to use the less common A5 grade, that's if you can get hold of these.

    Thread: Titanium vs Stainless Steel, see my note about SS bolts in post #3.
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    Summary:
    [​IMG]
    The A ... grade mark is about corrosion resistance, a higher number means better corrosion resistance.

    The Class ... grade mark is about strength, a higher number means stronger.
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    For all stainless steel fasteners, including screws, best go for A4 grade or higher for better corrosion resistance.

    Good luck !
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You noticed. I've been hospitalized for a few weeks and am in pretty poor shape at the moment (dammit). This is the time I love too, just when the days get long again, the temperatures are still fairly low and I can get a lot done.

    John, pictures are a good idea, particularly now with good resolution versions available on just cell phone. Take pictures from a very tight angle to the available light so the shadows are more visible, no flash. Not too much light, so the areas don't get "washed out", from over exposure. This was once a lot easier with old school 35mm cameras, which had a lot more control and non-automatic adjustments, which tend to cheat the areas you really need to see the most.

    Different color primers are a common thing I use to keep track of areas I've been or that might need more work. A pencil circling an area works too. A light dampened rag with denatured alcohol, will wipe a pencil line right off most things.

    Have a good look at your little jitterbug base. Most are plastic and attached with 4 screws to an isolating assembly under it. Peel back the rubber pad and remove the screws. The rubber pad can be replaced with a length of 1/8" acrylic (or plywood or PVC, etc.) so it becomes an elbow punishing machine from hell. In fact, replacing the rubber pad, on the new longboard addition work good for some thing too. If you do much of this you'll develop several sizes and thicknesses of "addition" to your jitterbug. Sometimes you need less or more flexibility (thickness) or simply length or shapes to make life easier.

    I've never met a single boat builder, that didn't have several tools or modified tools, possibly only used once, just to solve a serious "cat skinning" issue. I have a drawer full of these and yep, most have been used a few times, then found their remaining lives, on the bottom of this drawer.

    The portions of the hull that have the internal keel plank can be attached a few ways. Bedding over polyurethane is easy, though relies on fasteners for ultimate strength. Placing it in a bed of thickened goo has advantages, though repair or removal is more difficult. This isn't an area that may need serious maintenance, so I'd suggest lay it down in some goo and temporarily screw in place from the outside of the hull. A small fillet (1/4" tall) along each side will help shed water away from it too. This helps "marry" the plank to the hull shell, making it all one assembly.

    Lastly, when attaching things like the keel rub strip, do this over a fully finished surface. You'll be "bedding" these pieces, so the full exterior coating system should be in place. Light scuff the paint where the part will live (tape it off), then apply your bedding and fasten 'her down. Peel the tape and you'll look like a pro.
     
  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I've read your post on the George Buehler thread, which was quite a shock to me, both your post and the passing of George.

    Wish you a good recovery, please take your time . . :rolleyes:

    All the best !
     
  4. John Theunissen
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    John Theunissen Junior Member

    Thanks for the fine guidance Paul. I echo Angelique’s wishes to you for a speedy and full recovery, and also to heed her advice about taking it easy.
    Blessings, John T.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'll do okay, though carrying this damn defibrillator around is a pain in the asss.
     
  6. John Theunissen
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    John Theunissen Junior Member

    87F017D4-BCC8-4430-A164-3207FDA17554.jpeg 7E1E0342-87CC-4807-BF4C-44FA9DCD4CEB.jpeg Greetings everyone,
    Here are a couple of updated pics of the progress - fairing completed, exterior batten installed, final epoxy coating prior to painting, skeg cut to shape but not yet rounded or drilled. There is an opportunity coming up around mid April where there will be enough help (muscle power) around to turn the hull over, so I’ve taken advantage of the deadline to complete the remaining activities before then (painting, installation of the skeg, construction of the cradles etc.). Hopefully it all goes to plan....
     
  7. John Theunissen
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    John Theunissen Junior Member

    Greetings,
    It’s been a busy couple of weeks - working to a deadline to take the opportunity of having a number of my younger son’s friends available to help with the turnover. Here are a couple of pics leading up the event - skeg installed, protective strip on the exterior keel batten (I didn’t have time to finish that so will have to revisit it later - much more difficult I suspect), and the cradles in place. FC9258DF-54C2-443D-B7C9-3989DD8C159A.jpeg C36744E4-68FD-40D2-B95E-3D10770DDDC9.jpeg A363A584-8358-480B-A2CE-39EFA0C56DE5.jpeg
     
  8. John Theunissen
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    John Theunissen Junior Member

    CDC423BC-8627-43E1-93FF-94A10CCBB02A.jpeg 2B28E11C-7D98-4EBA-95C9-AFB93145478D.jpeg 3900A4B4-0273-4801-982E-C01EAF5B74A6.jpeg 6B5E32DE-3CF9-45E7-9925-0C166299AEC1.jpeg D2D1FEDD-BD49-4A31-979F-520A6982F33E.jpeg CE251D1F-378B-402A-B44B-78CC7CF0E212.jpeg F4B8F6EA-B6CC-4E24-A6D8-336EE3B00949.jpeg D32486C1-55C3-4295-92FF-582F8A9B9E2B.jpeg E7485791-7957-4EC6-9513-6582F66D185A.jpeg EE57E659-5AC1-4C29-828C-CF7DF93EA44B.jpeg 91A11DBC-0B21-46A6-B602-22EAD9DB6D59.jpeg And here are some action shots from the big day....
    The weather wasn’t exactly good - raining and it was quite windy on the day.
    Everything went off fine except that I had forgotten to detach the screws holding the first station mold to the strongback, so the folks at bow couldn’t understand why it was so heavy...anyway we figured it out and had a pregnant pause while that was resolved, unfortunately it was too late to save the station mold - it didn’t seem to matter though as the forward section was absolutely firm in terms of its shape, I guess the cold molding process of having two layers of ply bonded together with epoxy helps a lot.
     
  9. John Theunissen
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    John Theunissen Junior Member

    4DFB46FE-724E-46BB-8730-A119388B71DC.jpeg 42B755CC-049E-4507-A830-7DF4C87BE26F.jpeg C43C4D47-1B47-4CCB-943F-DC44FD01FD96.jpeg Here are some pics of the hull right way up on the strongback after the event. Paul, you can b rightfully proud of this design, the curves of the hull look fine and the sheerline is beautiful to my eyes - very pleased with the outcome so far.
    Regards, John T.
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Thank you for this post John, she looks good. As I mentioned in the design overview for this puppy, she was initially intended to be a pretty tough boat, so the hull shell should be pretty stiff, even missing most of the station molds. In fact, when I roll them I remove many of the molds, finding them a little redundant at this point.

    The roll over can be a worry-some event, but I've found that free bratwurst and beer (after the deed is done) can make a difficult roll, easy, fast and nothing to have worried about. She looks tight in that space, though I've worked in worse. If possible and the upright cradle is stiff enough, put some wheels on one or both ends, so you can "wheelbarrow" her around, to make more room.

    For those that can't remember, John is building a "Rocky", though a sloop version.[​IMG]
     
  11. John Theunissen
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    John Theunissen Junior Member

    Thanks Paul,
    You are right about the stiffness of the hull. In fact, once I’ve installed the inwales I think I might remove a couple of them.
    Yes, the building space is rather cramped (my error in construction) and because its a dirt floor my options are limited - I’ll push out the sides a little to give me a bit more space. I’ve managed so far, although the body has enjoyed a fair amount of bruising along the way.
    Hope your recovery is going well!
    Regards, John T.
     
  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I'm doing okay. I can't decide if it's the medication or actual damage, that's making me lack stamina and longevity on tasks. I'll get through, though may bitchandmoan a bit along the way.

    You can easily remove every other station mold at this point. I usually measure across at each mold and write down on the hull what this distance is. When the mold is removed I may put in a 1x2 brace, to insure this distance remains, but it's usually only a few braces that are needed, along the length of the hull, once all have been removed.
     
  13. John Theunissen
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Location: Melbourne, Australia

    John Theunissen Junior Member

    CC0E6D1C-EF59-4864-B510-984DAE4E89CA.jpeg 9BDA0985-BA53-4360-8ED2-44358BFED902.jpeg E8912D23-EDCA-4EEF-ADAE-EF0CB142F176.jpeg Greetings,
    I’ve taken your advice Paul and removed all the molds - she is absolutely firm in her shape, no movement at all. Here are some pics of the hull, right side up. Photos don’t do the curves justice though - the lines are very pleasant indeed.
    Next will be to install the sheer clamp, before doing the interior seam filleting and taping. As the hull is firm in it’s shape I reckon I can do all of the longitudinal seams before installing any of the bulkheads.
    Regards, John T.
     
  14. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's no sense in drawing up a boat that has ugly lines and shapes. I know there are those that absolutely love the "box boat" things, but to me they may be functional, I just can't get over the aesthetic . I'm glad you like them.

    Yep she should be fairly stiff, now, but the topsides around midships also should flex in, if you bear on them. This will change once the clamp and rails go on.
     

  15. John Theunissen
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    John Theunissen Junior Member

    B8B5881E-BC3D-49A6-825C-0DD48E7570E3.jpeg Greetings,
    Just finishing the install of the sheer clamp. I chose to laminate this using three layers of 7mm thick Merbau strips. It’s a similar process that I have used before and it has worked well in the past. The 69mm wide strips can be obtained in convenient 5.7m lengths from our local Bunnings store (they are finger jointed to obtain the length). I chose not to reduce the width, probably a bit of an overkill but I’d rather be conservative in this area.
    Regards, John T.
     
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